The Last Pickup

All we have to say is thank you thank you thank you for your support this season. We have learned a lot from this challenging year and we are so looking forward to a winter of planning, re-organizing, simplifying and strategizing. Our crew this year has been incredible beyond expectations. Through the rain, the constant changing of plans, and the frustration of crop failures they have been upbeat, good humored, flexible and incredibly strong. Our customers have kept us going and we can’t say how much we appreciate your support. Here’s to hoping for a mild winter and drier 2019!

We still have a few spaces left for the Winter Share! Don’t forget to sign up!

And email us at malaika@rootstotriverfarm.com to renew for 2019 and get your 5% discount!

Scenes from the farm: Winter greens planting in our driest houses, Breezy and her giant brassica plant, Duma’s eyes matching the fall foliage, fall foliage at the New Hope farm, Karl (the farm cooking school intern) delivering coffee to the garlic planting crew, and daikon purple brilliance.

The Share:

head lettuce

tatsoi

spicy bunches

cabbage

curly kale

lacinato kale

parsley

rutabaga

celery root

purple top turnips

fennel

radicchio

escarole

onions

garlic

potatoes

daikon

celery root

Daikon Fritters

http://www.foodwise.com.au/recipes/daikon-fritters/

Ingredients

1 medium-large daikon radish, peeled and grated

1/2 cup besan (chickpea) flour

1 tsp crushed ginger

1/2 cup spring onion or leek

Small handful fresh coriander, chopped

Dash of tamari or soy sauce

Water to bind

Oil for frying

Lemon slices to serve

Method

Peel and grate the daikon, chop up the leek or spring onion and coriander, and pop them into a mixing bowl. Add the ginger and dash of soy sauce or tamari and mix. Then add the besan (chickpea) flour and add water to measure to create a sticky batter by giving the ingredients a good mix, removing all lumps.

Cover the base of a frying pan or skillet with a good high smoking point oil such as light olive oil or peanut oil, and turn it on to high-medium heat.

Once the oil is hot, drop spoonfuls of the fritter batter into the hot pan, and flatten with a spatula. Fry until golden brown, flip and repeat. It should only take about 3-4 minutes per side. If your fritters are browning too fast, turn the heat down a little to avoid burning the sides and leaving the centre gooey.

When cooked through, remove from heat and place your fritter on some paper towel to drain.

Serve with a soy and rice vinegar dipping sauce, or just some freshly cut lemon wedges.

The End Weeks

It seems unbelievable to think the end of the official season is only weeks away since we are still in the midst of a crazy to-do list. The last of the winter plantings are going in the ground. The garlic will be planted this week for next year’s harvest. We still have crops to harvest for winter storage and tons of cleanup to do. It takes all season to build the farm and then we only have a few weeks to dismantle all our work and put it all to bed for the winter. It truly is a crazy 9 month ride.

This week we will be sending out our end of season member survey. Please let us know what you think of your experience!

Sign up for a winter share! It helps the farm stay in business all year and you get lots of yummy things to make soup with!

ALSO, 2019 renewals are available! Returning members who sign up before December get a 5% discount on their share for next year. (Share prices are the same as last year).

Thank you again for you support and please enjoy the last 2 pickups of the season!

Best,

You Farmers

head lettuce

special mix bunches

kale

tatsoi

parsley

fennel

daikon

sweet peppers

watermelon radish

escarole

kohlrabi

rutabaga

celery root

radicchio

onions

garlic

Celery Root Bisque with Walnut-Parsley Gremolata

45 MIN

Total Time

1 HR 30 MIN

Yield

Serves : 8

Ingredients

1 tablespoon unsalted butter 1 large leek, white and light green parts only, thinly sliced 5 garlic cloves, crushed 2 1/2 pounds celery root, peeled and cut into 1-inch dice (8 cups) One 2-inch chunk of Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese (1 ounce), plus 1/4 cup freshly grated cheese 2 cups chicken stock or low-sodium broth 1/2 cup walnuts 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 cup coarsely chopped parsley 1/2 cup heavy cream Kosher salt Pepper

GET INGREDIENTS

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How to Make It

Step 1

In a large saucepan, melt the butter. Add the leek and garlic and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until softened, 5 minutes. Add the celery root, Parmesan chunk, stock and 5 cups of water and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook over moderately low heat, stirring occasionally, until the celery root is tender, 40 minutes.

Step 2

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 375°. Spread the walnuts in a pie plate and toast for 5 to 7 minutes, until golden. Let cool, then finely chop and transfer to a bowl. Add the oil, parsley and grated cheese and mix well.

Step 3

In a blender, puree the soup in 2 batches until very smooth. Pour into a clean saucepan and stir in the heavy cream; season with salt and pepper and reheat if necessary. Serve topped with the walnut gremolata.

Make Ahead

The soup can be refrigerated for 2 days.

First Frost!

We had our first frost this week. We’ve been busy cleaning up the fields, protecting crops again the frost, and harvesting away! Fall’s bounty is really starting to roll in.

scenes from the farm: Phoenix picking hot peppers, happy radishes, Natalie’s gorgeous flowers.

the share:

Salad mix

special mix bunches

kale

tatsoi

parsley

fennel

daikon

sweet peppers

eggplant

shishito

watermelon radish

escarole

kohlrabi

dandelion

broccoli raab

cabbage

onions

garlic

s

recipe of the week:

fennel, orange, and cabbage slaw

ingredients

  • 6 cups shredded cabbage

  • 2 medium oranges, peeled and segmented

  • 1 large fennel bulb, thinly sliced

  • 1/4 cup chopped Italian parsley

  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise

  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

  • 1 teaspoon spicy brown mustard

  • 2 teaspoons brown sugar

  • Fresh cracked black pepper, to taste

  • 1/2 cup sliced almonds

how to make it

Step 1    

In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, oranges, fennel, and parsley.

Step 2    

In another bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, apple cider vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, mustard, brown sugar, and pepper.

Step 3    

Pour the dressing over the cabbage mixture and toss to coat. Chill and garnish with the almonds just before serving.

fall’s bounty

All this rain has made for some gloomy days, you know the ones that make you want to curl up with a cup of tea under a blanket. But there is so much beauty in the fall as well, the changing leaves, the moments when the sun peaks through the clouds, and of course fall’s produce bounty!

Scenes from the farm: beautiful harvest days, a perfect turnip among the asters, chaos with duma

the share

Fennel

Daikon radish

Purple top turnip

Tatsoi

Kale

Broccoli

Green cabbage

Napa cabbage

Parsley

Dandelion

Shishitos

Sweet peppers

Eggplant

Onions

Garlic

Buttered Turnip Puree

Ingredients
3 large turnips, peeled and cut into uniform chunks
1 quart milk
3 fresh thyme sprigs
1 clove garlic, peeled and gently smashed with the side of a knife
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, cut into small cubes
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions
Combine the turnips, milk, thyme and garlic in a medium saucepan. Set over medium heat and partially cover the pan. Bring to a gentle simmer and cook for 20 to 30 minutes, until the turnips are tender-the tip of a paring knife should go through without resistance.
Drain the turnips, reserving the cooking liquid, and transfer to a food processor (discard the thyme sprigs). Add about 1 cup of the reserved cooking liquid and the butter, season with plenty of salt and pepper and puree until smooth. Add more of the liquid, if necessary. Serve hot.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/tyler-florence/buttered-turnip-puree-recipe2.print.html?oc=linkback

cool mornings

It’s actually starting to feel like autumn on the farm. From cool foggy mornings to windy afternoons, fall is here. And that means seeding cover crop, planting for winter, cleaning up fields and harvesting fall’s bounty!

Please join us for the Winter Share and receive farm produce through the whole year! We have big plans for lots of greens and delicious roots. We'd love to have you. 

http://rootstoriverfarm.com/winter-share/

scenes from the farm: a glorious morning, garlic, perfect fennel, the purple top turnip

the share:

fennel

daikon radish

watermelon radish

purple top turnip

tatsoi

specialty greens

kale

kohlrabi

parsley

eggplant

sweet peppers

potatoes

garlic onions

cinnamon apple turnip soup

ingredients:

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus more for serving

1 medium onion, peeled and chopped

2 cloves garlic, smashed

1 1/2 pounds turnips, peeled and diced

1/2 pound Granny Smith apples (2 or 3) peeled and diced, plus more for serving

2 tablespoons packed dark brown sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt

3/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

3/4 teaspoon cinnamon, plus more for serving

1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional)

4 cups low-sodium chicken or vegetable stock

2-4 tablespoons heavy cream, plus more for serving

instructions:

Heat the oil in a large pot over medium-high heat. Add the onion and garlic and saute until the onion is translucent, 4 to 5 minutes. Add the turnips, apples, sugar, salt, pepper, cinnamon, and cayenne and saute until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add the stock and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, partially cover the pot, and simmer until the turnips and apples are fork-tender, about 20 minutes. Remove from the heat and puree the soup with an immersion blender (or in batches in a regular blender). Stir in the cream. Top with a drizzle of olive oil and cream, some chopped apples, and a sprinkle of cinnamon before serving.

October

We can’t believe it’s already October! We are starting to switch to clean-up mode but are still working hard to get ready for winter and stock the root cellar with what has survived this challenging season. So far the beets, potatoes, watermelon radishes, daikon, celery root, broccoli, , cabbages, cauliflower, fennel, radicchio, kohlrabi, napa cabbage, rutabaga, turnips and kale look great for the rest of the season and beyond. We had a total crop failure on our winter squash due to early disease, rot in the field and deer damage and a minor crop failure on our carrots where most of the sprouts rotted away after germinating in the field. Our greens and spinach have not fared well with all of the water - they suffer when their roots are constantly wet but we will continue to harvest what we can. For a farmer, a couple crop losses can overshadow and whole list of successes, but we also continue going with an eternal optimism that most of the time could be called stubbornness. It’s a good thing we love what we do.

I have said this before and I will say it many more times— we can’t thank you enough for your support this season. We hope that you’ve been enjoying the harvest this year - we have been doing the best we can and we couldn’t be doing it all without your membership. So thank you.

Scenes from the farm: fennel after weeding, radicchio weeding, zinnia patch still going strong, Breezy and Duma having deep talks, an afternoon field walk in the brassica patch.

The Share:

specialty greens

broccoli raab

tatsoi

kale

watermelon radish

sweet peppers

plum tomatoes

eggplant

fairytale eggplant

shishito peppers

fingerling potatoes

parsley

kohlrabi

onions

garlic

Roasted Kohlrabi with Parmesan

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchen/roasted-kohlrabi-with-parmesan-3561919

Directions

Peel 6 kohlrabi and cut into 1-inch wedges; toss with 2 tablespoons olive oil, 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt and a pinch of cayenne on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast at 450 degrees F, stirring every 10 minutes, until tender and golden, about 30 minutes. Toss with 3 tablespoons parmesan and 1 tablespoon chopped parsley.

The Rainy Days

I find this poem about sums it up these days (make sure to read to the end!):

The Rainy Day

By Henry Wadsworth

The day is cold, and dark, and dreary;

It rains, and the wind is never weary;

The vine still clings to the mouldering wall,

But at every gust the dead leaves fall,

And the day is dark and dreary.

My life is cold, and dark, and dreary;

It rains, and the wind is never weary;

My thoughts still cling to the mouldering Past,

But the hopes of youth fall thick in the blast,

And the days are dark and dreary.

Be still, sad heart! and cease repining;

Behind the clouds is the sun still shining;

Thy fate is the common fate of all,

Into each life some rain must fall,

Some days must be dark and dreary.

Scenes from the farm: Duma lying down during tomato harvest, Sarah harvesting in the rare sunshine, the end of the tomatoes, the dahlia field, roots sign from the market.

The share:

specialty greens

broccoli rabe

tatsoi

sweet peppers

hot peppers

eggplant

tomatoes

fairytale eggplant

kale

parsley

kohlrabi

onions

garlic

leeks

potatoes

beets

Caponata

MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN

YIELDServes 6 to 8

TIME1 hour, plus 1 hour's optional refrigeration

Caponata is a Sicilian sweet and sour version of ratatouille. Because eggplant absorbs flavors like a sponge, it’s particularly good in such a pungent dish. Like most eggplant dishes, this gets better overnight. It’s meant to be served at room temperature, and I like it cold as well. It makes a great topping for bruschetta.

INGREDIENTS

1 ½ pounds eggplant (1 large), roasted

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 medium onion, chopped

2 stalks celery, from the inner, tender stalks (the heart), diced

3 large garlic cloves, minced

2 red bell peppers, diced

Salt to taste

1 pound ripe tomatoes, preferably romas, peeled, seeded and finely chopped, or 1 14-ounce can crushed tomatoes (in puree)

3 heaped tablespoons capers, rinsed and drained

3 tablespoons coarsely chopped pitted green olives

2 tablespoons plus a pinch of sugar

3 tablespoons red or white wine vinegar or sherry vinegar (more to taste)

freshly ground pepper to taste

PREPARATION

Roast the eggplant, allow to cool and chop coarsely.

Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil over medium heat in a large, heavy nonstick skillet and add the onion and celery. Cook, stirring, until the onion softens, about 5 minutes, and add the garlic. Cook together for a minute, until the garlic begins to smell fragrant, and add the peppers and 1/2 teaspoon of salt. Cook, stirring, until just about tender, about 8 minutes. Add another tablespoon of oil and the eggplant, and stir together for another 5 minutes, until the vegetables are tender. The eggplant will fall apart, which is fine. Season to taste.

Add the tomatoes to the pan with about 1/2 teaspoon salt and a pinch of sugar. Cook, stirring and scraping the bottom of the pan often, for 5 to 10 minutes, until the tomatoes have cooked down somewhat and they smell fragrant. Add the capers, olives, remaining sugar, and vinegar. Turn the heat to medium-low and cook, stirring often, for 20 to 30 minutes, until the vegetables are thoroughly tender and the mixture is quite thick, sweet, and fragrant. Season to taste with salt and pepper and remove from the heat. Allow to cool to room temperature. If possible, cover and chill overnight. Serve at room temperature.

Looking forward

The only update on the farm we to offer that it is soggy and wet and we are oh so tired of the rain. We are starting to prep our greenhouses for winter and turning our hopes towards winter greens, cabbages and tomato sauce.

And that means… Winter Shares will be open soon! Our Winter CSA will be a little shorter in past years because of this challenging season. But we can guarantee that the share will be delicious with lots of vegetables and canned goods from the farm! We will open sign-ups in October, so get excited!

We will also be opening early sign-ups for next year’s CSA in the coming weeks! As a returning member you’ll get a discount for signing up before December and we can’t tell you enough how much your support means to us. In a season like this one, our CSA members have helped keep us a float. We hope you’ve enjoyed the veggies so far and we hope that the rest of the season brings some drier weather and lots of fall bounty. We have so many hopes.

Scenes from the farm: lacewing eggs (beneficial insect) on a hakurei stem, the flower patches in the dreary weather (come pick them before they’re gone!), peppers headed to Brooklyn to be made into hot sauce for the Brooklyn Grange.


The share:

lettuce

specialty greens

kale

parsley

broccoli raab

tatsoi

hakurei turnips

radishes

fingerling potatoes

cherry tomatoes

slicing tomatoes

onions

garlic

sweet peppers

hot peppers

lunchbox peppers

eggplant

fairytale eggplant

string beans

Braised Greens with Aleppo Oil and Feta

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/braised-greens-with-aleppo-oil-and-feta

INGREDIENTS

½ cup olive oil, divided

1 large fennel bulb, cored, thinly sliced

1 large onion, thinly sliced

Kosher salt

8 garlic cloves, thinly sliced

2 bunches Tuscan kale, tough stems removed, leaves torn into pieces

1 bunch broccoli rabe, tough stems removed, large clusters separated into smaller pieces

1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

1 tablespoon Aleppo pepper

½ teaspoon paprika

1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

6 ounces feta cheese, broken into large pieces

RECIPE PREPARATION

Heat ¼ cup oil in a large heavy pot over medium. Add fennel and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened and browned around the edges, 5–8 minutes. Add onion, season with salt, and cook, stirring occasionally, until translucent and just beginning to brown, 5–8 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring, until softened, about 3 minutes.

Add kale and broccoli rabe to pot a handful at a time, tossing to wilt after each addition before adding more. Stir in red pepper flakes; season with salt. Add 3 cups water and bring to a gentle simmer. Reduce heat and cook, partially covered, until greens are very tender, 35–45 minutes.

Meanwhile, bring Aleppo pepper, paprika, and remaining ¼ cup oil to a simmer in a small saucepan over low heat, swirling often, about 1 minute; let cool.

Add lemon zest and lemon juice to greens; taste and season with more salt. Transfer to a serving platter along with some of the braising liquid and top with feta. Drizzle with Aleppo oil.

Feelin' it.

I think if you talk to any farmer on the east coast about this season, I bet the resounding sentiment would be a very strong wish for the whole thing to be over. Please just let us put this behind us and start again. We’ve received another 3 inches of rain this week. Just while I thought we might be able to get ahead on cover cropping for the fall, weeding our storage crops and do the last of our seedings - the rain came again. Although the cool weather is a nice reprieve from the heat wave, it’s sad to think it may be too late to seed the last successions of greens, the tomatoes will all be split and that we may be battling weeds until the frost hits. All we can do is our best and we thank you so much for your support this season. The farm crew continues to work incredibly hard with a wonderful sense of humor and we shall plug away on our little patch of earth to feed our neighbors the best way we know how. Thank you.

Scenes from the farm: Breezy on the tractor with the zinnias, seconds tomatoes all loaded up to get processed into sauce (Thanks Mom for driving!), sunshine on the Pink Beauties, beautiful clouds over the farm, and wash tubs during harvest time.

The Share:

salad mix

head lettuce

specialty greens

broccoli raab

tatsoi

radishes

hakurei turnip

eggplant

fairytale eggplant

sweet peppers

lunchbox peppers

fingerling potatoes

onions

wax beans

summer squash

cherry tomatoes

slicing tomatoes

garlic

watermelon

Recipe of the Week:

Lemony Roasted Potatoes & Broccoli Rabe

Author: Cookie and Kate Prep Time: 15 mins Cook Time: 30 mins Total Time: 45 minutes Yield: 4 servings Category: Side dish Cuisine: Italian

★★★★★

5 from 8 reviews

This delicious side dish features golden roasted potatoes and tender, roasted broccoli rabe with Parmesan cheese melted into it. This recipe would also make a great breakfast—just serve with eggs! (Fried, poached, scrambled or hard boiled.) Recipe yields 4 side servings.

INGREDIENTS

Roasted broccoli rabe and potatoes

1 ½ pounds Yukon Gold potatoes, scrubbed

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided

¾ pound broccoli rabe (about 1 bunch)

¼ cup grated Parmesan

Pinch red pepper flakes

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Dressing

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice (about ½ lemon, juiced)

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1 garlic clove, pressed or minced

INSTRUCTIONS

Preheat oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit with racks in the middle of the oven and upper third of the oven. Slice the potatoes into ¾-inch pieces. On a large, rimmed baking sheet, toss the potatoes with 2 tablespoons olive oil and a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Bake for 30 minutes, turning halfway.

Meanwhile, prepare the broccoli rabe by rinsing it and spinning it dry in a salad spinner or patting it dry. Slice off the tough lower ends and any stems that are greater than ¼-inch in diameter and discard those pieces. Roughly chop the remaining broccoli rabe into 2- to 3-inch pieces.

On a separate large baking sheet, combine the broccoli rabe with 1 tablespoon olive oil, the Parmesan, a pinch of red pepper flakes and a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Use your hands to rub the ingredients into the broccoli rabe, so it’s lightly but thoroughly coated in oil. Arrange the broccoli rabe in a single layer. Once the potatoes have only 8 minutes baking time remaining, place the baking sheet on the upper rack in the oven.

While the potatoes and broccoli rabe finish cooking, whisk together the dressing ingredients. Once the timer goes off, the broccoli rabe should be tender and turning crispy in places, and the potatoes should be golden and tender throughout. If not, bake leave one or both pans in the oven a couple more minutes.

Transfer the contents of both pans to a bowl and drizzle the dressing into the bowl. Toss to mix well, then season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve immediately.

Not so end of summer

We are not feeling like it's the end of the summer here on the farm. With another heat wave upon us and the tomatoes still ripening like crazy - we have no sense of the ending of things. We worked our way through Labor Day - the plants don't stop for holidays, so neither do we. However, September does begin a welcome shift. We are about the plant our last lettuces in the field and we will do our last seedings next week. We are starting to plant cover crops for the fall (of course now that we've done that - it stops raining) and our fields will begin to empty of storage crops. We know the next 2 months will go fast, so for now we're still revelling in the sweat and summer bounty of early September.

Scenes from the farm: the tiniest pepper, mountains of cherry tomatoes, the clean radish field, picking cherry tomatoes in the insane heat, heart tomato

The Share:

Specialty greens mix

Tatsoi

broccoli raab

radishes

hakurei turnips

cherry tomatoes

heirloom tomatoes

sweet peppers

hot peppers

basil

fairytale eggplant

shishito peppers

swiss chard

watermelon

string beans

potatoes

onions

garlic

 

Chickpea & Tatsoi Coconut Curry

Serves 4

Prep time:  10 minutes

Cook time:  40 minutes

 

1 cup basmati rice (or rice of choice

2 Tablespoons coconut oil

1 medium sized onion, diced

3 cloves of garlic, minced

2 teaspoons curry powder

1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

salt and pepper freshly ground black pepper

1/2 cup vegetable stock (or water)

1 (15 ounce) can of chickpeas, drained

1 (15 ounce) can full-fat coconut milk

1 Tablespoon fresh lime juice

3 cups roughly chopped tatsoi

 

  1. Cook the rice according to specific instructions on the package.
  2. Heat the oil in a large dutch oven or soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally until fragrant, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic, curry powder, red pepper flakes and a healthy pinch of salt and pepper. Cook for 1 minute longer, stirring often to coat the onion and garlic in the spices.
  3. Add in the vegetable stock, chickpeas and coconut milk. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Add the lime juice and tatsoi and keep on low heat until the tatsoi wilts down. Season to taste with additional salt and pepper.
  4. Serve the soup with a scoop of rice and enjoy.

*If you cannot find tatsoi you can substitute with spinach
*Use this recipe as a guide and adjust measurements and ingredients as necessary
*Taste test as you go

From http://dishingupthedirt.com/recipes/soup/chickpea-tatsoi-coconut-curry/

 

The End of August

Oh the end of August. We're sick of weeds and almost sick of tomatoes. Our days are mostly spent harvesting, sorting and packing. We're sending our first round of tomato seconds to get processed into sauce and we are so ready for those crisp fall days. But we're loving the flower patch and our weed-free fall greens, we're excited watching the cabbages and cauliflowers grow and we're looking forward to that big potato harvest. The peppers have finally turned and we're eating as much eggplant as possible! We hope you're enjoying the last few days of August and savoring the flavors of summer!

Scenes from the farm: 1st of the fall greens, harvesting tomatoes, the sunflower patch, the PYO flower patch, ripe peppers!

The Share:

Head lettuce

Swiss Chard

Basil

Cherry Tomatoes

Slicing Tomatoes

Eggplant

Fairytale Eggplant

Sweet Peppers

Hot Peppers

shishito peppers

Cucumbers

Summer Squash

Onions

Garlic

carrots

watermelon

Smoky Eggplant Spread

DAVID TANIS

  • YIELDabout 2 cups
  • TIME40 minutes

Essentially a delightful eggplant schmear to eat with warm pita triangles, this spread gets its pleasant smoky flavor from a deliberate charring of the eggplant skin. Whether over hot coals or under the broiler, the eggplant must be mercilessly blackened (the inner sweet flesh gets steamed to softness in the process). Tahini, olive oil, cumin, lemon and hot pepper take care of the rest.

Featured in: A Round Friend To Everyone

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 medium eggplants, about 2 pounds
  •  Salt
  • ¼ cup tahini paste
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
  • 4 garlic cloves, mashed to a paste
  • ⅛ teaspoon cayenne
  • ½ teaspoon cumin seed, toasted until fragrant and coarsely ground
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon paprika
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped parsley
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped mint
  •  Pita or other flatbread, for serving (optional)
  •  

    Nutritional Information

    •  

Email Grocery List

PREPARATION

  1. Prepare a charcoal fire or heat the broiler. Pierce eggplants here and there with the point of a paring knife. Place eggplants 2 inches from heat source. Allow skins to blister and char, turning with tongs until entire surface is blackened and eggplants are completely soft, about 10 to 12 minutes. Set aside until cool enough to handle.
  2. Slice eggplants in half lengthwise and lay skin side down on a cutting board. Carefully scrape away flesh with a knife and put it in a colander. Discard burned skins. Do not rinse eggplant flesh — a few bits of remaining char is fine. Salt flesh lightly and leave for 5 to 10 minutes, then squeeze into a ball to remove liquid.
  3. Blitz eggplant, 1/2 teaspoon salt, tahini, lemon juice, garlic and cayenne in a food processor or blender to obtain a creamy purée. (For a more rustic spread, beat with a whisk instead.) Taste and adjust salt and lemon juice if necessary. Transfer mixture to a shallow serving bowl.
  4. Just before serving, stir together cumin and olive oil, and spoon over the mixture’s surface. Sprinkle with paprika, parsley and mint. Serve with warm pita cut into triangles if desired.

 

 

Watermelon

I'm stealing what I wrote about watermelon 2 years ago, because I can't say it better than I did then and it's more relevant than ever:

One of our favorite CSA crops is in! Watermelon! It's a crop we don't grow for any other market, because it really isn't that profitable. It takes 3 months to grow, it's incredibly heavy, takes up a lot of room and doesn't go for much of a price. It's impossible to compete with the grocery store's 10 pounders for $3. We grow it for our CSA members and ourselves as the perfect late summer treat. We grow smaller, sweeter varieties that are easier to carry and can be eaten in one sitting.

We also only grow watermelon with seeds. There are a couple of reasons for this decision. Seeds are such an important part of food sovereignty and self sufficiency that we choose not to grow seedless watermelon because of a philosophical stubbornness. We want to, if we choose, to be able to reproduce the vegetables we grow without having to get our seeds from a corporation.


The second reason is that years ago a CSA member who is a mother of 2 daughters, 4 and 6 years old at the time picked up their share during watermelon time and told me her daughters had never eaten a seeded watermelon before. She told me that they had such a fun time eating outside and learning to spit the seeds out. I was shocked. I had spent so many hours of my childhood eating entire watermelons with my friends having competitive seed spitting contests off the back porch. I remember letting the juice drip down my chin to the grass because no one needs a napkin when you're eating outside. Seeds and watermelon were such an important part of my childhood summers and I was so happy to provide that experience for those little girls.

So, we encourage you to revel in the magic of the seeds, eat outside and enjoy the true taste summer.

Scenes from the farm: Duma in the beans, Julie and Steph in the sad tomato forest, the massive eggplant of the year, the sunflower patch at Gravity Hill is blooming!

The Share:

salad mix 

head lettuce

basil

swiss chard

watermelon!

sweet peppers

eggplant

fairytale eggplant

summer squash

cucumbers

carrots

basil

scallions

onions

cherry tomatoes

slicing tomatoes

shishito peppers

Recipe of the week: It's time!!

Ratatouille 

GOURMET JUNE 1991

YIELD

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

    • 1 onion, sliced thin
    • 2 garlic cloves, minced
    • 5 tablespoons olive oil
    • a 3/4-pound eggplant, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 3 cups)
    • 1 small zucchini, scrubbed, quartered lengthwise, and cut into thin slices
    • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
    • 3/4 pound small ripe tomatoes, chopped coarse (about 1 1/4 cups)
    • 1/4 teaspoon dried oregano, crumbled
    • 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme, crumbled
    • 1/8 teaspoon ground coriander
    • 1/4 teaspoon fennel seeds
    • 3/4 teaspoon salt
    • 1/2 cup shredded fresh basil leaves

PREPARATION

  1. In a large skillet cook the onion and the garlic in 2 tablespoons of the oil over moderately low heat, stirring occasionally, until the onion is softened. Add the remaining 3 tablespoons oil and heat it over moderately high heat until it is hot but not smoking. Add the eggplant and cook the mixture, stirring occasionally, for 8 minutes, or until the eggplant is softened. Stir in the zucchini and the bell pepper and cook the mixture over the moderate heat, stirring occasionally, for 12 minutes. Stir in the tomatoes and cook the mixture, stirring occassionaly, for 5 to 7 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender. Stir in the oregano, the thyme, the coriander, the fennel seeds, the salt, and pepper to taste and cook the mixture, stirring, for 1 minute. Stir in the basil and combine the mixture well. The ratatouille may be made 1 day in advance, kept covered and chilled, and reheated before serving.

Taking Stock

Mid-August is a good time to take stock of the farm. I lot of questions of the season have been answered. We can leave the spring - whether good or bad behind us, ride the wave of summer crops, and hope for fast and happy growth of the fall plantings. We have almost finished seeding new transplants for the season and it is almost time to turn our attention to winter plans and seedings. But August is for taking stock not for planning just yet - the onions are garlic are in, the root crops are seeded, the cabbage is planted, the potatoes are finished growing and we are surrounded by the lushness of summer.  We are still wishing for those peppers and tomatoes to turn and looking longingly into our soaking wet fields wishing the sun would come out and stay out. 

Scenes from the farm: the beautiful PYO zinnia patch at Gravity Hill, the incredible arrow head I found while flame weeding carrots in Solebury, the amazing eggplant coming out of the fields right now, the sky after unpacking from CSA pickup last Wednesday, and when the tractor is full of wasps nests you borrow your husbands bee suit to finish seeding radishes. 

The Share:

head lettuce 

salad mix 

swiss chard

cucumber

summer squash

basil

asian eggplant

italian eggplant

fairytale eggplant

green peppers

shishito peppers

carrots

onions

purslane

cherry tomatoes

slicing tomatoes

Sautéed Shishito Peppers: Summer's Best New Bite 

DEBORAH MADISON MARCH 2013 VEGETABLE LITERACY

 

PREPARATION

    1. Here's what you do. Heat a little olive oil in a wide sauté pan until it is good and hot but not smoking. Add the peppers and cook them over medium, tossing and turning them frequently until they blister. They shouldn't char except in places. Don't rush. It takes 10 to 15 minutes to cook a panful of peppers. When they're done, toss them with sea salt and add a squeeze of fresh lemon. Slide the peppers into a bowl and serve them hot. You pick them up by the stem end and eat the whole thing, minus the stem, that is.
    2. You can probably do fancier, cheffy things with them, but they're terrific like this. For variety, I sometimes use a little toasted sesame oil instead of olive oil and finish them with togarashi. If you have leftovers, an unlikely event in my experience, chop off the stems and put the peppers in an omelet or some scrambled eggs.

Tomato Fest!

Please join us this Saturday on our Titusville farm for our Tomato Fest!

All info is here: https://www.facebook.com/RootsToRiverFarmFest/?hc_ref=ARQOrvPuJDKUSoL90sge6V6Eq5HIS2METZEP-tvXymK576-GjskvZREwr8JOewTPQAg

We'll have lots of great vendors, kids activities, music, cooking workshops and organic tomatoes from amazing of local farms! (As you know, ours are still green in the fields...)

Scenes from the farm: the smiling crew, the view from the top of Gravity Hill, the winter squash patch, our next planting of lettuce looking great. 

The Share:

swiss chard

basil

hakurei turnips

asian eggplant

italian eggplant

green peppers

radicchio

cucumbers

summer squash

string beans

cherry tomatoes

slicing tomato

potatoes

carrots

purslane

One more week until lettuce is back - so try a cucumber salad!

Cucumber and Mint Salad Recipe

JENNIFER SEGAL

Ingredients

  • 2 English (hothouse) cucumbers
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup chopped red onions
  • 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2-1/2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh mint

Directions

  1. 1.

    Cut the cucumbers in half lengthwise. Use a teaspoon to scrape out the seeds, then cut into thin slices. Toss the cucumbers with the salt in a colander. Let drain in the sink for at least 30 minutes, then tap the colander on the base of the sink to release any remaining water. Lay a clean dish towel flat on the counter, and then dump the cucumbers over top. Use the edges of the towel to blot the cucumbers dry.

  2. 2.

    Meanwhile, soak the red onions in a small bowl of ice water for at least 10 minutes, then drain in a fine mesh strainer.

  3. 3.

  4. In a medium bowl, combine the cucumbers, onions, white wine vinegar, olive oil, vegetable oil, sugar, pepper and mint. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. Cover and let stand in refrigerator for at least 20 minutes. Serve cold.

August

I'm sure I've posted this one before but it's just so good and it's so...August, that I will just have to do it again. 

August by Mary Oliver

When the blackberries hang
swollen in the woods, in the brambles
nobody owns, I spend

all day among the high
branches, reaching
my ripped arms, thinking

of nothing, cramming
the black honey of summer
into my mouth; all day my body

accepts what it is. In the dark
creeks that run by there is
this thick paw of my life darting among

the black bells, the leaves; there is
this happy tongue.

 

Scenes from the farm: planting our last succession of summer squash and cucumbers in the muddy fields, harvesting a beautiful crop of onions, the amazing pepper, eggplant and tomato field looking healthy, our amazing crew cleaning garlic, Breezy seeding our fall and winter carrots and beets (fingers crossed!). 

The share:

swiss chard

tatsoi

spicy greens

escarole

radicchio

summer squash

cucumbers

green peppers

asian eggplant

potatoes

purslane

garlic

spring onions

hakurei turnips

basil

carrots

LEMON-GARLIC SWISS CHARD SALAD

http://dishingupthedirt.com/recipes/lemon-garlic-swiss-chard-salad/

PREP TIME: 15 MINUTES    COOK TIME: 10 MINUTES    SERVES: 4 

  • 1/4 cup unsalted almonds
  • 3 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 cloves of garlic, diced
  • 1 small shallot, diced
  • 1 bunch of swiss chard, stems and center ribs cut out and chopped into a large dice. Stack the greens, roll them like a cigar and slice them into thin rounds, about 1/4 inch thick
  • 1/4 cup golden raisins
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/4 cup freshly grated parmesan

Preparation

  1. Heat a large dry skillet over medium high heat. Add the almonds and cook, shaking the pan occasionally, until toasted. About 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and when cool enough to handle roughly chop.
  2. Heat the olive oil in the same large skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and shallot and cook, stirring occasionally, until fragrant and beginning to soften. About 1 minute. Add the chard stems, golden raisins and white wine. Simmer the mixture until the chard stems become tender, the raisins are plump, and the liquid reduces a bit, about 5 minutes.
  3. Stir in the chard leaves and a hefty pinch of salt and pepper. Continue to cook until the chard leaves turn bright green and tender. About 2-3 minutes. Stir in the lemon juice, parmesan cheese and sprinkle with the toasted and chopped almonds. Season to taste with additional salt and pepper if need be.

Notes

*Use this recipe as a guide *Adjust measurements and ingredients as necessary *Taste test as you go *Cooking times will vary from kitchen to kitchen

The Summer Slump

This is the time of the year every CSA farmer dreads. The slump in between spring and summer crops when the succession plantings don't quite seem to have matched up and we're just waiting and waiting on those summer crops to ripen. Some years the slump is more dramatic than others, of course with the late spring and our late planted summer crops, it was bound to happen. And here we are, in between lettuce plantings and just willing those tomatoes to turn. A farming season is a marathon, not a sprint - some periods will be a little slower - some incredibly bountiful, but we must continue on. We thank you for your patience. 

Scenes from the slump: beautiful huge clusters of unripe tomatoes (some of the best fruit-set we've ever had!), incredible flowering eggplants with no fruit yet, and pepper laden with green peppers. 

The Share:

salad mix

arugula

spicy greens

purslane

swiss chard

kohlrabi

string beans!

new potatoes

summer squash

cucumbers

tatsoi

broccoli raab

radicchio

escarole

fennel

basil

garlic

spring onions

dandelion

carrots 

Purslane and Parsley Salad 

IAN KNAUER GOURMET AUGUST 2008

INGREDIENTS

    • 3 tablespoons olive oil
    • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
    • 1 tablespoon finely chopped shallot
    • 1/2 pound cherry tomatoes (preferably assorted heirloom varieties), halved or quartered if large
    • 6 cups packed tender purslane sprigs and leaves (from a 1-pound bunch)
    • 4 cups packed flat-leaf parsley leaves (from 2 large bunches)

Preparation

      1. Whisk together oil, lemon juice, shallot, and 1/4 teaspoon each of salt and pepper in a large bowl.
      2. Add tomatoes, purslane, and parsley, gently tossing to coat.
    • Cooks' note:

      Herbs and greens can be washed and dried 1 day ahead, then chilled in sealed plastic bags lined with paper towels. Toss with tomatoes and vinaigrette just before serving.

 

Observations

So much of being a farmer is being an observer. I spend hours each week just looking around the farm. Watching for ripeness, for disease, for pests, for growth, for germination, for maturity, for weeds, for death. The farm and every crop are constantly changing. Is there enough moisture? Too much? Will the weeds take over this week or next? Are the flea beetles too much or will the plants be ok? And so many times there are no answers to the question of why. Why didn't our second seeding of beets and carrots germinate even after plenty of rain and fertilizer? Why are the plants in the seedling flats stunted and small when nothing has changed in the seeding mix? And this is when the ultimate excercise in letting go must happen, even though you've done everything right, the crop has failed with no reasonable explanation. Observation and letting go, those are the farmer's 2 biggest jobs. 

Scenes from the farm: some choice harvests of radicchio and garlic, the second succession of tomatoes looking great, and a sample of the pictures my phone has the most of: broken pieces of things so I can remember what parts to buy and how they fit back together. 

The share:

salad mix

arugula

spicy mix

head lettuce

spring onions

tatsoi

broccoli raab

dandelion greens

hakurei turnips

carrots

new potatoes!

summer squash

fresh garlic

radicchio

fennel

escarole

parsley

kohlrabi 

Roasted Potato and Fennel Salad

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/roasted-potato-and-fennel-salad-recipe-3415453

Yield:

10 to 12 servings

Ingredients

  • One 5-pound bag red potatoes, cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 2 fennel bulbs, cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 3 tablespoons minced fresh chives
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley

Directions

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil. 

Combine the potatoes, fennel, olive oil, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Spread the mixture in a single layer on the prepared baking sheet. Bake until the potatoes are tender and lightly browned, about 25 minutes. Cool, about 30 minutes. 

Combine the mayonnaise, chives and parsley in a large bowl. Add the cooled potato mixture, tossing gently to combine. Serve immediately, or cover and chill up to 3 days.

 

 

July

The garlic is in, the winter squash is planted, the tomatoes are trellised, the weeds grow on. We are plugging away at our summer farm and oh so thankful for this sun keep it all growing. 

If you haven't yet - please meet the crew this year on our website! They are incredibly hard working, fast learners, good humored and tough enough to get through this bonkers season. We're so happy to have them all here, working hard to grow all the food.

http://rootstoriverfarm.com/people/

Scenes from the farm: the cub in the morning mist (now if only we could get it started), 1st succession of tomatoes all staked up, melons growing and freshly cultivated, Duma hanging in the barn, and a Sunday afternoon walk in the woods. 

The Share:

head lettuce

salad mix

spicy greens

tatsoi

radishes

cabbage

kale

kohlrabi

radicchio

escarole

fennel

fresh garlic

spring onions

carrots

hakurei turnips

Grilled Escarole 

JODY WILLIAMS MARCH 2016BUVETTE: THE PLEASURE OF GOOD FOOD

 

YIELD

4 servings

ACTIVE TIME

10 minutes

TOTAL TIME

20 minutes

INGREDIENTS

    • 1 head escarole, outer leaves removed and saved, thoroughly washed
    • Extra-virgin olive oil
    • Coarse salt
    • 1/2 cup pitted, crushed green olives

 

PREPARATION

  1. Get your grill going. If you’re using charcoal, you’re looking for a not-too-hot fire (I like to think of the coals as being “soft,” which is to say they should be halfway through burning). If you’re using a gas grill, set the heat to medium. If you’re using a grill pan indoors, set it over medium-low heat.
  2. Shake the escarole dry. Cut it lengthwise straight through the core into 4 wedges. Drizzle each wedge with plenty of olive oil, about 1 1/2 tablespoons per wedge, and season aggressively with salt. Grill the wedges, turning only once, until wilted and charred in spots, about 10 minutes altogether.
  3. Transfer the escarole to a serving platter, give it a healthy drizzle of olive oil, and scatter the olives over the top. Serve immediately.

The Heat Wave

From rain to heat! Our summer crops are loving this weather and we're hoping our spring ones hold on for a few more days through the wave. We're drinking lots of water, starting earlier and enjoying dips in the river at the end of the day. In the middle of the season, we can't stop for heat nor holiday, we must continue on. Today is our garlic harvest. It is usually the turning point of the season when we switch from planting to harvesting, but since we are still weeks behind schedule, our summer harvest has yet to some in and our summer planting continues. We're just going with the flow that is the farm season, and hydrating as much as possible. 

We hope you enjoy your 4th of July festivities. Please stay cool and safe! 

Reminder: Buckingham Pickup will be on THURSDAY from 3:30 to 7pm. 

Scenes from the farm: cultivating onion pathways, when you forget the pickup truck at the other farm on a harvest day, high tunnel tomatoes looking great, seeding a field of sunflowers on the hottest day of the year!

The Share:

head lettuce

spicy greens

arugula

kale

broccoli

cabbage

radicchio

fennel

carrots

escarole

parsley

kohlrabi

tatsoi

broccoli raab

garlic scapes

spring onions

radishes

Radicchio Slaw

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/michael-chiarello/radicchio-slaw-recipe2-1914820

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons fennel seeds
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • 3 tablespoons cider vinegar
  • Gray salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 to 3 romaine lettuce hearts, torn
  • 2 to 3 medium heads radicchio, torn
  • 1 large head cabbage, shredded
  • 1 bunch watercress, trimmed of large stems

Directions

Prepare the dressing by placing the fennel seeds in a small saute pan over low heat. Toast, tossing occasionally, about 2 to 3 minutes, or until lightly browned. Crush the toasted seeds with the edge or a pan, in a mortar and pestle, or seal in a plastic bag and roll with a rolling pin.

In a saucepan, place the honey, cider vinegar, salt and pepper, and toasted fennel seeds. Bring to a boil, stirring well. Remove from heat. Whisk in olive oil and season, to taste.

Place the romaine, radicchio, cabbage, and watercress in a large serving bowl. Add warm dressing and toss well. Serve immediately.

Summer Time

We have truly been enjoying these beautiful days on the farm. Even though the list is long, it's so nice to be a farmer in this weather. We are still planting away and getting ready for our fall crops. The harvest continues to not be what we are wishing for, but with all the happy plants we have in the ground, the bounty will come soon enough. We hope you are all getting a chance to be outside and enjoy these beautiful first few days of summer!

Scenes from the farm: plowing for winter squash, the farmer's dashboard, killing weeds with the tractor, a sample daily to-do list diagram, picking peas in the pea jungle

The Share:

kale

head lettuce

salad mix

fennel

kohlrabi

beets

carrots

sugar snap peas

summer squash

spring onions

broccoli

radicchio

garlic scapes

Recipe of the week:

Kohlrabi, Fennel and Blueberry Salad

Total Time

30 MIN

Yield

Serves : 6

STEPHANIE IZARD 

July 2011

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup sliced almonds
  • 2 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger
  • 2 tablespoons minced shallot
  • 1 tablespoon white balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon mayonnaise
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon pure maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup grapeseed oil
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 1/4 pounds kohlrabi, peeled and very thinly sliced on a mandoline
  • 1 fennel bulb, trimmed and thinly sliced on a mandoline
  • 2 ounces semifirm goat cheese, such as Evalon, Garrotxa or Manchester, shaved (1/2 cup)
  • 1 cup blueberries or pitted, halved sweet cherries
  • 2 tablespoons torn mint leaves

How to Make It

Step 1    

Preheat the oven to 350°. Spread the almonds on a pie plate and toast for about 7 minutes, until golden. Let cool.

Step 2    

In a mini food processor or blender, combine the ginger, shallot, vinegar, mayonnaise, mustard, soy sauce and maple syrup and puree. With the blender on, add the grapeseed oil in a thin stream and blend until creamy. Season the dressing with salt and pepper.

Step 3    

In a large bowl, toss the kohlrabi with the fennel, cheese, toasted almonds and dressing. Season with salt and pepper and toss to coat. Add the blueberries and mint and toss gently. Serve right away.