week 1!!

Welcome to the first week of the 2018 CSA! If this is your first year with us, you can use this blog as a reference to keep up with the farm. I will update it every week before the Pickup with news from the farm or some farm musings, pictures, a list of what will be available in the share that week and one recipe that uses one or two items from the share.  

Week #1:

We are so happy to finally have some produce to share with you. This spring has been the most challenging of all my years of farming. Such consistent rain in such large quantities is about the worst type of conditions for a small vegetable farm such as ours. Too much rain means we can't get into the fields to plant, weed, prep beds, or seed. It also means that the plants we manage to get into the ground suffer from their roots being too wet. In saturated conditions, nutrients do not run through the soil and cannot be taken up by plants and without the sun our poor crops can't dry their leaves to fight fungal diseases or grow at normal rates. 

All that being said, our crew has been in great spirits. And we have done what we can when we can to get through these challenges. It means later nights on the tractor to finish before the next rain or long days weeding by hand since we can't get our cultivators in the wet fields. We have managed to get lots of plants in the ground now waiting for their time in the sun. The new drainage systems and designs we implemented in the beginning of the season have definitely helped and we are so thankful for all of the community support we've gotten these last few months from other farmers, customers and all of you. 

Here are some scenes from the last couple months: Remember when it snowed in April?

The Share:

salad mix 

head lettuce

tatsoi (like a spinach- bok choi combo!)

broccoli raab

kale

garlic scapes

sugar snap peas

spicy greens

dandelion greens

radishes

kohlrabi

napa cabbage

scallions

 

Recipe(s) of the week:

10 Things to Do with Garlic Scapes

https://www.bonappetit.com/test-kitchen/ingredients/article/garlic-scapes

  1. Blitz some stalks into a garlicky pesto. If you're a hardcore garlic fan, leave out the basil altogether in favor of the scapes. Otherwise, substitute garlic scapes for up to half of your greens and proceed as usual. (Don't have a go-to pesto recipe? Find one here.)
  2. Fold chopped and sautéed garlic scapes into frittatas or our best-ever scrambled eggs.

  3. Chop garlic scapes into little coins and add to stir-fries and fried rice.

  4. Finely dice a couple of garlic scapes and and mix into a vinaigrette. (They also make a tasty addition to green goddess dressing.)

  5. Throw whole scapes on the grill, just like you would make grilled scallions.

  6. Fold chopped scapes into a dip for grilled meat or roasted veg.

  7. Cut garlic scapes into 6-inch pieces and pickle them. (Think pickled green beans or thin kosher dill pickles.)

  8. Sauté scapes and use them as a pizza topping. Don't forget to save any leftover sautéeing oil for drizzling.

  9. Use the scapes whole in a warm-weather-friendly braise.

  10. Mix chopped scapes with a stick of butter to make a garlicky compound butter for grilled or pan-fried fish.

 

 

end of winter

As the winter share comes to a close this week, we are feeling more signs of spring.  The sun has been peaking through the clouds more and more, melting the snow and warming the soil.  It's about to be very busy for us on the farm, and we are eager to get out in the fields!  The Market will be open each week to tide you over until the summer share starts up in June, we hope you will join us!

scenes from the farm: some beautiful head lettuce, jars of yum, our amazing crew harvesting 

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the share:

1 jar kraut

1 tomato jar

4 onions, 4 carrots, 1 kale, 2 head lettuce

choice of pea shoots or spicy mix

 

recipe of the week

1-Pot Lentil Stew

https://minimalistbaker.com/1-pot-everyday-lentil-soup/

Ingredients:

  • 2 Tbsp (30 ml) water (or sub oil of choice, such as avocado or coconut)
  • 2 cloves (6 g) garlic, minced (or sub 2 Tbsp garlic-infused oil*)
  • optional: 2 small shallots or 1/2 white onion, diced
  • 4 large (~245 g) carrots, thinly sliced
  • 4 stalks (~160 g) celery, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 tsp each sea salt and black pepper (divided), plus more to taste
  • 3 cups (~500 g) yellow or red baby potatoes, roughly chopped into bite-size pieces*
  • 4 cups (960 ml) vegetable broth
  • 2-3 sprigs fresh rosemary or thyme (I used a bit of both)
  • 1 cup (192 g) uncooked green or brown lentils, thoroughly rinsed and drained
  • 2 cups (~130 g) chopped sturdy greens (such as kale or collard greens)

Instructions:

  1. Heat a large pot over medium heat. Once hot, add water (or oil), garlic, shallots/onion (optional), carrots, and celery. Season with a bit of salt and pepper and stir.
  2. Sauté for 4-5 minutes or until slightly tender and golden brown. Be careful not to burn the garlic (turn heat down if it's cooking too quickly.)
  3. Add potatoes and season with a bit more salt and pepper. Stir and cook for 2 minutes more.
  4. Add vegetable broth and rosemary or thyme and increase heat to medium high. Bring to a rolling simmer. Then add lentils and stir. Once simmering again, reduce heat to low and simmer uncovered for 15-20 minutes or until lentils and potatoes are tender.
  5. Add your greens, stir, and cover. Cook for 3-4 minutes more to wilt. Then taste and adjust flavor as needed, adding more salt and pepper for overall flavor, vegetable broth if it's become too thick, or herbs for earthy flavor.
  6. Enjoy as is or serve with rice, cauliflower rice, or a side of flatbread or rolls.

Sign of Spring

It truly feels like spring today! The peepers are peeping, the greens are growing and the buds are popping! Our potting soil was delivered, we've cleaned up the greenhouse, the seeds are organized and we're ready to start the onions! What a wonderful time of hope and new beginnings. Soon, we'll get the tractors up and going and we'll be plowing in no time. There is always part of me to see the winter go, I love the coziness of shorter days, long walks in the cold and getting to sleep in a little bit. But once the season starts it feels like the most natural thing in the world to be in the dirt all day and come home bone tired. We have lots of exciting things planned and a great crew this season! Make sure to sign up for the summer share!

Scenes from the farm: garlic popping up, beautiful greens and Breezy's heart-beet pizza!

The Share:

salad mix

arugula

head lettuce

kale

1 jar kimchi or tomato 

onions

5 pounds roots: beets, carrots, potatoes, kohlrabi, daikon

 

Recipe of the Week:

Carrot Kohlrabi and Arugula Salad

http://www.coco-cooks.com/2010/07/carrot-kohlrabi-and-arugula-salad/

Serves 2

  • 1 Kohlrabi ( skinned and grated)
  • 2 carrots ( skinned and grated)
  • 1 red bell pepper , Julienned
  • Arugula

Vinaigrette

  • 1 part red wine vinegar
  • 1 part olive oil
  • 1/8 tsp mustard powder
  • 1/8 tsp garlic powder
  • dried herbs
  • salt and pepper to taste
  1. In a bowl mix your grated  carrots and kohlrabi .
  2. Mix up your Vinaigrette ingredients and toss.
  3. Toss in with the Arugula.
  4. Serve.

 

 

Valentine's on the Farm

Love it is in the air.  We are feeling so much love the roots that keep us nourished during these drab days, the greens that are unstoppable in the green house, the soil, and sunshine filled days!  

scenes from the farm: the herb garden, loving  our carrots, Kat's salad

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the share

1 bag salad mix
1 head lettuce
1 bunch kale
1 jar kraut or kimchi
8 lbs roots
dried rosemary
4 onions

Balsamic Rosemary Roasted Root Vegetables

http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/balsamic-rosemary-roasted-root-vegetables

Ingredients: 

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary or 1 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • 2 large parsnips, peeled, quartered, and cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices
  • 3 small beets, peeled, quartered, and cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
  • 2 carrots, cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices
  • 1 turnip, peeled, quartered, and cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
  • 1 small rutabaga, peeled, quartered, and cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
  • Salt, to taste
  • Freshly ground pepper, to taste

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 450°.
  2. Whisk together first 3 ingredients in a bowl.
  3. Add parsnip and next 4 ingredients; toss until vegetables are well coated. Add salt and pepper, and toss again.
  4. Place in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet, and bake at 450° for 15 minutes. Stir vegetables, and bake 15 more minutes or until slightly crisp and golden but tender.

 

A bit more sun


This week we are starting to notice the days getting longer. Sunshine comes and reminds us that spring will come but there are still many weeks of winter to get through. We are in full planning mode on the farm, dreaming of growing and green. For now though, we are happy to honker down and enjoy our roots.

scenes from the farm: a frosty morning, Duma watching over the greens, color salad mix.

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The Share

Salad mix
Head lettuce
1 jar tomato (free choice)
1/4 cheese pumpkin
Rosemary sprigs
onions
7 pounds roots: carrots, beets, watermelon radish, celery root, potatoes, kohlrabi, daikon, rutabaga

Daikon Radish Fries

http://nobunplease.com/crispy-daikon-fries/

Ingredients 

  • 1 daikon radish, peeled and sliced into "french fry" finger size and shape 
  • 1/4 cup of coconut oil, melted
  • 1 generous pinch of sea salt
  • spices of your choice

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 475 degrees F.
  2. Peel the daikon radish with a vegetable peeler and then slice into french fry shapes (about three inches long, half an inch thick).
  3. Run under cold water a few times to remove any excess starch and pat dry.
  4. In a large mixing bowl, combine melted coconut oil, salt, pepper and spices of your choice.
  5. Cover daikon radish fries with mixture evenly and spread out onto a baking sheet in a single layer.
  6. Place into the oven for about 15 minutes.
  7. After 15 minutes, flip them and bake for roughly another 15 minutes (baking time will vary for ovens and the thickness of your fries).
  8. After all of the fries are golden brown and crispy, remove from the oven let them cool on an additional baking sheet lined with paper towels.
  9. Serve with a dipping sauce of your choice (chipotle mayo or Thai peanut sauce work great!).

Mid-January

All summer long we spend the days battling pests. In the winter, most of our bug problems disappear and we breath a sigh of relief from the absence of cucumber beetles and cabbage loopers. But then come our biggest winter foe - the vole. We've built warm houses for our plants that are perfect houses for small field rodents, and lucky for them we've already filled them with food! Every day they make more progress on our greens, eating out the middles of the the lettuce heads (arguably the best part for any consumer) and we watch with little at our disposal to stop them. We've tried to outsmart them, but why bother with a little peanut butter when you have a house full of fresh greens to choose from? Can't say I blame them, but they sure do cause otherwise peaceful farmers thoughts of violence and vengeance as our heard earned winter crop disappears before our eyes. We'll keep trying to keep them at bay and keep our plants going until they make full size in February, and then we will be the ones feasting on kale. 

Scenes from the farm: Ice on the river, the farm crew getting excited over seed catalogs. watermelon radish, winter light tree at the farm. 

The Share:

salad mix

1 jar canned tomatoes

1 cabbage

1 winter squash

onions

Mixed roots: carrots, beets, potatoes, parsnips, watermelon radish, daikon, kohlrabi, rutabaga, turnips, celery root.

 

ROASTED CARROT HUMMUS

https://www.thefullhelping.com/roasted-carrot-hummus/

SERVES: 6-8 SERVINGS

Ingredients

  • 4 large carrots, roughly chopped
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Sea salt or kosher salt and black pepper to taste
  • 1½ - 2 cups chickpeas, cooked (homemade is preferable, but canned is A-OK)
  • ¼ cup tahini
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 clove garlic, roughly chopped
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil, for drizzling (optional)

Instructions

1. Preheat the oven to 400F. Toss the carrots with the olive oil, salt, and pepper. Place them on a baking sheet and roast for 20 minutes, or until tender and browning along the edges.

2. Place the chickpeas in a food processor or Vitamix along with the carrots, olive oil, salt and pepper, tahini, cumin, paprika, garlic, and lemon juice. Pulse a few times to break it all down. Turn the motor on and drizzle in ½-2/3 cup water slowly, stopping often to scrape the container down. Use your judgment on how much water to add; I used ⅔ cup, but less might be sufficient to obtain a creamy texture.

3. When the hummus is perfectly smooth, transfer it to a serving dish and drizzle a tablespoon of olive oil over it. Serve.

 

A New and Very Cold Year

2018 has arrived! And with it, an arctic blast. Winter growing sure was easy the last 2 years, and now we find ourselves covering and uncovering our frozen greens hoping they make it through this chilly spell. We ended up planting them a couple weeks late with the optimism only a farmer can have for a mild December and January. We're still crossing our fingers for our little plants to come through when we get a little thaw in the weather and keep us in greens for February and March. Speaking of optimism...here's to a great 2018! We know the weather will be perfect, the tractors will never break again, and the pests won't be hungry. It's going to be a great year!

Scenes from the farm: Duma watches the greens harvest, ice patterns on the Tohikon, fox on the farm, and the first mushroom harvest! (limited quantity available at market).

The Share:

salad mix

tatsoi

winter squash

onions

kale

cabbage

Roots: carrots, beets, parsnips, watermelon radish, potatoes, daikon, celery root, rutabaga, hakurei turnip, purple top turnip, kohlrabi

1 jar tomato sauce

1 container arugula pesto

 

Solstice Feelings

The winter solstice reminds us to take a breather in the midst of a busy holiday season. Enjoy the darkness, sit longer, sleep more, and take advantage of the quick hours of sunshine. In the summer, the light goes so long, we forget that it's a gift we don't always have. I always get frustrated with the quickness of a winter day, it feels so hard to get anything done in the few short hours of daylight - I've never been very good at working once the sun goes down. But maybe it's a good time to revel in the darker hours, let the days go by without trying to hold onto to them as much, trust that the light will return and with it a more productive day. 

Scenes from the farm: snow over garlic, the most amazing salad mix, sunset over Pleasant Valley Rd, Duma and the farm tree (bamboo from the back yard and white pine from the farm).

The Share:

salad mix

tatsoi

spinach

cabbage or napa cabbage

onions

winter squash

Choice of roots: watermelon radish, kohlrabi, daikon, potatoes, hakurei turnips, rutabaga, carrots, beets, parsnips, and sweet potatoes (organically grown from Fernbrook Farm in Bordertown NJ).

Recipe of the Week:

100-Layer Root Vegetable Gratin

Recipe from the Tasting Table Test Kitchen

Yield: 8 to 10 servings

Prep Time: 20 minutes, plus cooling time

Cook Time: 1 hour

Total Time: 1 hour and 20 minutes, plus cooling time

INGREDIENTS

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

1 cup coarsely grated Gruyèrecheese

1 cup coarsely grated Comté cheese

1 cup coarsely grated Parmesan cheese

1½ pounds (4 large) parsnips, thinly sliced on a mandoline

1 tablespoon, plus 2½ teaspoons, kosher salt, divided

1½ pounds (1 large) celery root, thinly sliced on a mandoline

1 pound (3 medium) sweet potatoes, thinly sliced on a mandoline

1 pound (2 medium) white turnips, thinly sliced on a mandoline

1½ pounds (3 medium) Yukon Gold potatoes, thinly sliced on a mandoline

3 cups heavy cream

1 tablespoon thyme leaves

2 garlic cloves, finely grated

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1 cup (4 ounces) coarse sourdough bread crumbs

2 tablespoons roughly chopped parsley, plus more for garnish

2 tablespoons roughly chopped sage, plus more for garnish

1 tablespoon olive oil

Pinch red pepper flakes

DIRECTIONS

1. Preheat the oven to 400º and grease a 9-by-13-inch baking dish with the butter. In a small bowl, toss the cheeses together and set aside.

2. In the greased baking dish, layer the parsnips in overlapping layers to cover the dish. Season with ½ teaspoon of kosher salt and scatter ½ cup of the cheese mixture over top. Continue this process of layering, seasoning and scattering ½ cup of the cheese mixture with the celery root, sweet potatoes and turnips. Layer the Yukon Gold potatoes last and season with the remaining ½ teaspoon salt. Do not top with any cheese.

3. In a small pan, combine the cream with the remaining 1 tablespoon of salt, the thyme leaves, garlic and black pepper. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, then remove from the heat and pour into the dish over the vegetables. Place a piece of parchment directly over the vegetables and bake until the vegetables are tender when pierced with a paring knife, 45 to 50 minutes.

4. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, toss the bread crumbs with the parsley, sage, olive oil and pepper flakes. Remove the baking dish from the oven and discard the parchment. Scatter the remaining 1 cup of grated cheese over the vegetables, followed by the bread crumb mixture. Return to the oven and bake until golden brown, 15 to 20 minutes more.

5. Remove from the oven and let cool for 20 minutes before cutting. Garnish with more parsley and sage, then serve.

 

 

 

Winter Share

After a brief break for Thanksgiving, we are back at it! In the fields and the greenhouses and the storage coolers we have lots of delicious food waiting for you! The weather has held on nicely so we are still picking fresh greens from the fields. Our fingers and toes are quite appreciative of the warmer temperatures and our bellies are full of roasted root vegetables. We can't wait to start our winter share with you!

Scenes from the farm: December salad greens house, the crew making sauerkraut (will be ready for the last week's of the winter share), harvesting arugula in the field,  and beautiful wreaths made by our flower farmer (for sale at the pickup!).

The Share!

spinach

arugula

salad mix

tatsoi

Choice of kale or purple broccoli leaves

Choice of radicchio or cabbage

fennel 

onions

winter squash

Free choice roots: beets, carrots, potatoes, parsnips, rutabaga, hakurei turnips, kohlrabi, watermelon radish, daikon

1 jar tomato butter (use just like jam!)

Recipe of the Week

Shaved Kohlrabi and Arugula Salad with Chunky Garlic and Pimenton Dressing

marthastewart.com

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 medium heads garlic 
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest, plus 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 
  • 1/2 teaspoon pimenton picante (hot Spanish smoked paprika) 
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 
  • Coarse salt 
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 
  • 2 medium or 1 large kohlrabi (1 pound), trimmed 
  • 1 1/2 cups arugula, trimmed 
  • 1 ounce toasted sliced almonds (1/4 cup)

DIRECTIONS 

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Remove 1 garlic clove from 1 head, and very finely grate, setting aside 1/8 teaspoon. Wrap remaining heads of garlic in foil, and roast until very soft and golden inside, about 1 hour. Unwrap; let cool. 

2. Meanwhile, whisk together grated garlic, lemon zest and juice, paprika, mustard, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1 teaspoon water in a small bowl. Squeeze roasted garlic from skins, and add 2 tablespoons to bowl, reserving remainder for another use. Stir to combine but leave very chunky. Stir in oil (do not completely incorporate). 

3. Shave kohlrabi very thinly on a mandoline. Divide among 4 plates; season with 1/2 teaspoon salt. Spoon dressing over kohlrabi, then top with arugula leaves and almonds.

 

 

Our best crop

The official last pick of our fall season is tomorrow. It is indeed bittersweet as our incredible crew will soon be disbanding. Some are moving away to new adventures, some are staying for another season but this particular group of stellar humans and workers will never be on the farm together again. It is surreal knowing that the family we form each season on the farm is always just 9 months long. We go through such an intense experience together - fighting all the odds and working the longest hours to grow a year's worth of food. I truly believe that work is love made visible and this particular type of work creates lasting relationships for the people who engage in it every year. But the family ebbs and flows just like the season's do and we'll continue to provide a place for people to feel good about what they do and get their hands dirty, maybe just for 9 months or maybe for the rest of their lives. I feel so grateful for all the people who have worked on this farm and for our customers who continue to support us through it all. This food community is our best crop. 

Scenes from the farm: the farm crew enjoying a well-deserved dinner and dancing, farm dogs in the misty morning, bagging parsnips, the largest tatsoi, farm dogs in front of the wood stove - signs of winter. 

The Share:

kale

spinach

arugula

specialty greens mix

head lettuce

tatsoi

cabbage

parsnip

daikon

watermelon radish

beets

carrots

celery root

purple top turnips

rutabaga

fennel

hakurei turnips

onions

kohlrabi

parsnips

MASHED POTATO, RUTABAGA AND PARSNIP CASSEROLE WITH CARAMELIZED ONIONS 

BON APPÉTIT NOVEMBER 1994

YIELD

Serves 8 to 10

INGREDIENTS

    • 7 cups canned low-salt chicken broth (or vegetable stock)
    • 3 pounds russet potatoes, peeled, cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
    • 1 1/2 pounds rutabagas, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
    • 1 1/4 pounds parsnips, peeled, cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
    • 8 garlic cloves
    • 1 bay leaf
    • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
    • 3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) butter, room temperature
    • 3 large onions, thinly sliced

 

PREPARATION

    1. Butter 13 x 9x2-inch glass baking dish. Combine first 7 ingredients in large pot; bring to boil. Reduce heat, cover partially and simmer until vegetables are very tender, about 30 minutes. Drain well. Transfer vegetables to large bowl. Add 1/2 cup butter. Using electric mixer, beat mixture until mashed but still chunky. Season with salt and pepper. Transfer mashed vegetables to prepared dish.
    2. Melt remaining 1/4 cup butter in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Add sliced onions and sauté until beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low and sauté until onions are tender and golden brown, about 15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Spread onions evenly over mashed vegetables. (Casserole can be prepared up to 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate.)
    3. Preheat oven to 375° F. Bake casserole uncovered until heated through and top begins to crisp, about 25 minutes.

November marches on...

Whew! Last week was tough! The crew worked extra hours and we got all the veggies in and all the greens covered. It looks like everything survived those freezing temps and we're feeling pretty good that all our hard work paid off! We have walk-in coolers full of vegetables for the winter and greens sweetened by the freeze. The weeds have finally died and we are hoping the caterpillars have too. We are finishing our last seeding in the greenhouses for winter and starting to plant the garlic. Our to-do list is still full of cleanup and root washing before winter but the end of this crazy season is near...

Scenes from the farm: Kat and the giant fennel; Breezy and Phoenix the happy harvesters; the cooler half-full; Breezy and Ember harvesting in the cold; Duma eating cabbage; Malaika, Laura and Breezy after the late-night emergency squash transfer; Ember, Laura and Kat seeding swiss chard for the winter. 

The Share:

arugula

spinach

head lettuce

specialty greens

kale

radicchio

cauliflower

fennel

cabbage

cilantro

beets

carrots

lunchbox peppers

kohlrabi

hakurei turnip

tatsoi

swiss chard

celery root

radishes

winter squash

onions

garlic

 

Roasted Carrot & Fennel Soup

This simple vegan soup can be prepared quickly on a weeknight. Roast the carrots in advance for and even faster meal.

 Course Soup

 Prep Time 10 minutes

 Cook Time 30 minutes

 Total Time 40 minutes

 Servings 

 Author Megan

Ingredients

  • 1 pound carrots
  • Olive oil
  • 1 bulb fennel
  • 1/2 cup sliced onion
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 4 cups vegetable broth

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

  2. Slice carrots into planks and toss with olive oil. Roast for about 20 minutes.

  3. Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a stockpot set over medium.

  4. Trim fronds from fennel and save for another use (I like to use it as a bed for baking fish). Slice fennel bulb thinly.

  5. Add fennel and onion to the pot and stir to coat with oil. Cook, stirring occasionally, until quite soft and starting to caramelize.

  6. Stir in ginger, coriander, salt, and pepper.

  7. When the carrots have roasted, add them to the pot, then add the vegetable broth. Bring everything to a boil then reduce to a simmer for 10 minutes.

  8. Using an immersion blender, puree soup until smooth. Serve, with sriracha or cream, if desired.

 

Before the FREEZE

This week we are hustling through the cold and rain to get everything out of the fields before it freezes on Friday! This is a pretty early freeze, we usually expect some hard frosts in November but a low time temp of 20 degrees is pretty extreme. We might have to work a few extra hours this week but we'll get it done. Cabbages, root veggies, broccoli and greens all either have to be covered or harvested before a freeze. The crops being stored in tunnels will have to be moved into places that won't freeze and our new winter greens will get their first shock of real cold. Weather extremes like this mean changing strategies - bringing in crops the fastest way possible, waiting to wash them and getting everything inside and out of the cold first. It's a farmer's job to always be flexible and willing to change the plan. 

Scenes from the farm: first succession of winter lettuce in this house, beds ready for garlic, Duma sleeping next to his favorite snack, Ember on her first solo tractor drive, and storage carrots ready to go. 

The November Extension Share!

head lettuce

arugula

specialty greens

tatsoi

spinach

kale

carrots

beets

fennel

radicchio

escarole

swiss chard

sweet peppers

onions

garlic

winter squash

broccoli

kohlrabi

rutabaga

radishes

hakurei turnip

cabbage

CARROT PIE

 

 

PRINT

PREP TIME

10 mins

COOK TIME

80 mins

TOTAL TIME

1 hour 30 mins

CARROT PIE – PERFECT FALL & HOLIDAY PIE

http://www.craftycookingmama.com/carrot-pie-perfect-fall-holiday-pie/

If you like pumpkin pie you're going to love this carrot pie. Sweet, creamy, perfectly spiced and it's easier to make!

Serves: 8 servings

INGREDIENTS

  • pre-baked and cooled 9" pie crust
  • 1½ pound carrots
  • 2 tablespoon butter, softened
  • ½ cup sugar
  • ½ cup brown sugar, packed
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ginger
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • ¾ cup half and half
  • 1 tablespoon flour

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Peel and chop carrots.
  2. Place carrots in large pot, cover with water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer until carrots are tender, about 25 - 30 minutes.
  3. Drain water. Return carrots to pot. Cook carrots over low heat, stirring constantly, for a few minutes, to steam off all excess water.
  4. Puree carrots and butter until absolutely smooth. You can do this in a food processor, blender, food mill or with a ricer.
  5. I use my food processor. After the carrots are smooth, mix in sugars, eggs, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt, ginger, vanilla, half & half and flour until well combined.
  6. Pour mixture into prebaked & cooled 9" pie crust.
  7. Bake at 350° for 50 - 60 minutes or pie is set and toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.
  8. Cool on wire rack. Refrigerate for 1-2 hours before serving. Serve with whipped cream and enjoy 
  9.  

 

A sense of final things

As halloween candy fills our pockets out to the field, we revel in how nice it is to be outside this time of year and soak up the sights and smells. The soil is soft and cool to the touch and planting for the winter is such a satisfying task. Once the last of the greens are in and the garlic is planted we will have finished sowing our seeds for the year. There is so much more of a finality to these days that every task feels more significant. The crew this year has been the best ever - dealing with the chaos of running 2 farms, the late nights of 2 CSA pickups and the early mornings of additional markets and harvest days. Every morning they still greet each other with smiles and hugs and snacks to share through out the day. I feel so lucky to spend my days with these great people and as we check off the final lists it feels nice to relax a bit and enjoy each other's company as the season winds down for the winter. 

Scenes from the farm: mondo-fall fennel is the best, the Delval lacrosse team once again helping pick up our plastic mulch from the fields (thank goodness), Laura getting in the Halloween spirit, a portrait of the long island cheese pumpkin.

The Share:

arugula

specialty greens

salad mix

head lettuce

kale

hakurei turnips

carrots

beets

spinach

cabbage

kohlrabi

broccoli

escarole

fennel

radicchio

tatsoi

celery root

cilantro

dill 

parsley

winter squash

onions

garlic

parsnips

Roasted Parsnip Soup with Walnut Pesto

INGREDIENTS

 

  • 2 pounds medium parsnips, peeled, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided

  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

  • 2 tablespoons walnuts, toasted

  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped mixed fresh herbs (such as tarragon, flat-leaf parsley, and chives)

  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

  • 4 cups vegetable stock

 

RECIPE PREPARATION

  • Preheat oven to 400°. Toss parsnips with 1 Tbsp. oil in a large bowl and season with salt and pepper. Arrange parsnips in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet and roast until tender and lightly caramelized, 22–25 minutes.

  • Meanwhile, pulse walnuts and herbs in a mini-processor until very finely chopped. (Alternatively, crush walnuts and herbs with a mortar and pestle to form a coarse paste.) Add remaining 2 Tbsp. oil and lemon juice and pulse to combine. Season pesto to taste with salt and pepper. Set aside.

  • Let parsnips cool slightly, then transfer to a blender. Add stock; purée until smooth. Pour soup into a large saucepan and heat over medium heat until warmed through. Season with salt and pepper and divide among bowls. Drizzle with pesto and serve.

After apple picking

While we haven't been picking apples, this is exactly how we feel. Robert Frost always says it best. 

“After Apple-Picking” by Robert Frost

My long two-pointed ladder’s sticking through a tree
Toward heaven still,
And there’s a barrel that I didn’t fill
Beside it, and there may be two or three
Apples I didn’t pick upon some bough.
But I am done with apple-picking now.
Essence of winter sleep is on the night,
The scent of apples: I am drowsing off.
I cannot rub the strangeness from my sight
I got from looking through a pane of glass
I skimmed this morning from the drinking trough
And held against the world of hoary grass.
It melted, and I let it fall and break.
But I was well
Upon my way to sleep before it fell,
And I could tell
What form my dreaming was about to take.
Magnified apples appear and disappear,
Stem end and blossom end,
And every fleck of russet showing clear.
My instep arch not only keeps the ache,
It keeps the pressure of a ladder-round.
I feel the ladder sway as the boughs bend.
And I keep hearing from the cellar bin
The rumbling sound
Of load on load of apples coming in.
For I have had too much
Of apple-picking: I am overtired
Of the great harvest I myself desired.
There were ten thousand thousand fruit to touch,
Cherish in hand, lift down, and not let fall.
For all
That struck the earth,
No matter if not bruised or spiked with stubble,
Went surely to the cider-apple heap
As of no worth.
One can see what will trouble
This sleep of mine, whatever sleep it is.
Were he not gone,
The woodchuck could say whether it’s like his
Long sleep, as I describe its coming on,
Or just some human sleep.

Scenes from the farm: Re-skinning the greenhouse (it took 4 tries but we finally got it done), winter greens seeded, Farmer Malaika so happy with her arm full of radicchio.

The Share:

salad mix

head lettuce

arugula

salad mix

kale

spinach

cabbage

beets

carrots!

kohlrabi

broccoli

escarole

fennel

radish

watermelon radish

radicchio

tatsoi

celery root

sweet peppers

eggplant

cilantro

dill

parsley

potatoes

winter squash

onions

garlic

Recipe of the week:

Arugula, Carrot & Celery Root Salad with Almonds

 

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbs. apple cider vinegar
  • 2 Tbs. honey
  • 1 tsp. Dijon mustard
  • 6 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 6 medium carrots (1 lb.)
  • 1 medium celery root (3/4 to 1 lb.)
  • 6 lightly packed cups baby arugula (about 6 oz.)
  • 3/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted
  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Preparation

  • In a small bowl, whisk the vinegar, honey, and mustard. Whisk in the oil and season with 1/2 tsp. salt and a few grinds of pepper.

    Peel and trim the carrots and celery root and then grate them in a food processor fitted with a medium grating disk. Transfer to a large bowl. Add the arugula, half of the almonds and half of the cilantro; toss with the vinaigrette. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with the remaining almonds and cilantro and serve.

 

The Frost Hustle

We had our first frost this morning. It was light enough not to damage any of the plants but it was a kick in the pants to get our fields cleaned up and keep working on our harvest list. While it seems like the farm should be slowing down our to-do list is still long and the time we have before the ground freezes is short. The frost gave us permission to begin to dismantle the tomato field and harvest the last of the peppers. It's time to move on and race to end of the season. 

Scenes from the farm: removing the old greenhouse plastic to put on a new skin before seeding winter greens, beautiful harvest days, the pumpkin patch in Titusville, radicchio harvest, Duma sleeping on everything but his bed (also, the chaos of the barn by the end of the season). 

The Share:

head lettuce

salad mix

arugula

specialty greens

spinach

napa cabbage

green cabbage

kale

beets

kohlrabi

broccoli

escarole

fennel

radish

radicchio

tatsoi

celery root

sweet peppers

eggplant

cilantro

dill

parsley

potatoes

winter squash

onions

Recipe of the week:

Fennel, Orange, and Cabbage Slaw

Ingredients

  • 6 cups shredded cabbage
  • 2 medium oranges, peeled and segmented
  • 1 large fennel bulb, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup chopped Italian parsley
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon spicy brown mustard
  • 2 teaspoons brown sugar
  • Fresh cracked black pepper, to taste
  • 1/2 cup sliced almonds

How to Make It

Step 1    

In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, oranges, fennel, and parsley.

Step 2    

In another bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, apple cider vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, mustard, brown sugar, and pepper.

Step 3    

Pour the dressing over the cabbage mixture and toss to coat. Chill and garnish with the almonds just before serving.

 

Harvest Moon

As we still sweat under this extended summer sun, we begin to bring in the winter harvest and feast our eyes upon the October skies. We honor the harvest moon by keeping going, seeding cover crop, planting for winter, cleaning up fields and bringing in that bounty.

Our last fall share is the last week of October. We are offering a fall extension this year for the month of November! The fall-extension pickup will be at our Titusville location only on Wednesdays from 3:30-6:30. Please let us know if you are interested!

Scenes from the farm: harvest moon over the sunrise, October skies, castelfranco radicchio, Breezy tilling in the greenhouse for winter greens. 

The Share:

salad mix

arugula

specialty greens mix

spinach

head lettuce

kale

napa cabbage

kohlrabi

broccoli

escarole

fennel

radish

radicchio

hakurei turnips

tatsoi

celery root

eggplant 

ground cherries

curly endive

hot peppers

cilantro

dill

parsley

potatoes

winter squash

onions

GRILLED RADICCHIO SALAD WITH SHERRY-MUSTARD DRESSING 

JAMIE PURVIANCE BON APPÉTIT AUGUST 2007

YIELD

Makes 6 servings

INGREDIENTS

    • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil plus additional for drizzling
    • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill
    • 1 tablespoon Sherry wine vinegar
    • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
    • 1 teaspoon honey
    • 6 green onions, trimmed
    • 1 head of romaine lettuce, quartered lengthwise with some core still attached to each piece
    • 1 large head of red leaf lettuce, quartered lengthwise with some core still attached to each piece
    • 1 medium head of radicchio, quartered through core, with some core still attached to each piece

 

PREPARATION

    1. Whisk 3 tablespoons olive oil and next 4 ingredients. Season with salt and pepper.
    2. Arrange green onions, lettuces, and radicchio on baking sheets. Drizzle lightly with oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.
    3. Prepare barbecue (medium-high heat). Grill vegetables until beginning to wilt, 1 minute per side for red leaf lettuce, 1 1/2 minutes per side for romaine, 2 minutes per side for green onions, and 3 minutes per side for radicchio. Transfer vegetables to baking sheets.
    4. Cut cores from all grilled greens. Cut grilled radicchio crosswise into 1-inch-wide strips. Cut grilled lettuces crosswise into 2-inch-wide strips; chop green onions. Place vegetables in large bowl. Drizzle with dressing; toss to coat.

October

"Autumn is the mellower season, and what we lose in flowers we more than gain in fruits." 
-Samuel Butler

As we weed the last of the weeds, we start to look to the long harvest list of the fall. One bed at a time we'll bring in, wash, bag, label and stack for the winter. October is time to bring the bounty. 

Scenes from the farm: perfect spinach beds with farmer shadow, watermelon radish and purple daikon for storage, field scenes, Duma-dog wears a farm hat.

The Share:

arugula 

specialty greens

salad mix

head lettuce

kale

escarole

curly endive

radish

beets

potatoes

kohlrabi

spinach

winter squash

onions

garlic

cilantro

dill 

parsley

sweet peppers

hot peppers

eggplant

cherry tomatoes

baby tatsoi

Recipe of the Week:

Farmer Kat's Famous Endive Salad

Ingredients:

1 head endive

R2R specialty greens mix

4 tablespoons olive oil

1 teaspoon salt

Black pepper

Optional: apple, radish, hakurei slices for crunch

Dressing:

1 stalk scallion

2 cloves garlic

1 teaspoon fresh ginger

Juice from half a lemon or 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

2 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1/4 cup olive oil

Cut a head of endive in half and spread both halves out on a sheet pan with oil and salt and pepper. Roast at 350 degrees for a few minutes or until wilted and a little crispy on the edges. In a large bowl, put a handful of R2R Specialty Greens mix. Cut endive after cooked and add to bowl.

Cut up and add apples, hakurei turnips or radishes for crispy bite. 

For the dressing: Combine olive oil, lemon juice or apple cider vinegar, chopped scallion, chopped garlic, ginger and mustard. Add salt and pepper to taste. 

 

 

Extremes

What a season of extremes. We've gone from cold and wet to hot and dry. The harvest has gone from just enough to way too much. It can be jarring on the system to be constantly figuring out how to deal with too much water and hardly enough crops harvest  straight to setting up the irrigation and looking around the farm trying to figure out what to do with it all. We know this season of extremes is now the new normal and it's up to us to figure out how to adapt. So, we'll keep the sprinkler going day and night and enjoy our bounty.

Scenes from the farm: Breezy with some beautiful napa cabbage, Ember harvesting radishes, the tiniest bell pepper ever, the largest watermelon radishes ever, sweet pepper, tomatoes, and Kim being a dandy-lion. 

The Share:

salad mix

arugula

specialty greens

head lettuce

spinach

watermelon radishes

radish bunches

escarole

napa cabbage

sweet peppers

eggplant

hot peppers

swiss chard

kale

kohlrabi

cherry tomatoes

heirloom tomatoes

potatoes

onions

garlic

winter squash

Recipe of the week:

ESCAROLE WITH PAN-ROASTED GARLIC AND LEMON

http://www.nytimes.com/2001/01/31/dining/bridging-seasons-with-escarole.html?mcubz=1

Time: 40 minutes

1 large head escarole

8 to 10 cloves garlic, peeled

1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil

Juice of 1/2 lemon, or to taste

1/2 lemon, cut into 6 wedges.

1. Slice escarole crosswise into ribbons about 1 1/2 inches wide. Rinse escarole well, drain, and pat dry with paper towels. Set aside. Halve (lengthwise) any large cloves of garlic; cloves should be of uniform size. Set aside.

2. Place a 12-inch or bigger sauté pan over medium-low heat, and add olive oil. When oil is warmed, reduce heat as low as possible. Add garlic, and toss to coat well with oil. Cook partly covered, stirring occasionally, until garlic is translucent and very tender, about 25 minutes. Do not allow garlic to brown or it will be bitter.

3. When garlic is tender, raise heat to medium-high, and immediately add escarole. Toss escarole until it is well-coated with oil and just begins to wilt, about 1 minute. Add lemon juice to taste, and toss again. Add lemon wedges, and toss until escarole is barely tender and still green, about 2 minutes. Serve immediately.

 

Thoughts of Fall and Winter but feels like Summer

September holds onto summer as we blast through the end of the month. Even though it doesn't feel like it now, we are changing gears to get our farm ready for winter. Please join us for the Winter Share and receive farm produce through the whole year! We have big plans for lots of greens and delicious roots. We'd love to have you. 

http://rootstoriverfarm.com/winter-share/

Meanwhile, fall bounty is upon us! 

Scenes from the farm: fall lettuce and spinach, fall roots, fall fields, fall morning.

The Share:

head lettuce

salad mix

specialty greens

swiss chard

kale

napa cabbage

escarole

spinach

radishes

hakurei turnips

kohlrabi

winter squash

onions

garlic

cherry tomatoes

heirloom tomatoes

sweet peppers

eggplant

hot peppers

dill 

parsley

ground cherries

AND DON'T FORGET TO COME PICK YOUR PUMPKIN!!

Recipe of the week:

Kale and Napa Cabbage Salad with Greek Yogurt Dressing

Total time

20 mins

Kale and Napa Cabbage Salad with Greek Yogurt Dressing is ribbons of kale and Napa cabbage combined with apples, dried cranberries, green onions, and toasted pecans in a creamy, Greek yogurt dressing. This salad is one great way to eat your greens in a very delicious, different way!

Serves: 6-8 servings

Ingredients

Salad:

  • 1 bunch dinosaur kale, tough stems removed, washed, and cut into thin ribbons
  • 4 ounces Napa cabbage (I used ¼ of a medium head), washed and cut into thin ribbons*
  • 2 green onions, white and green parts, sliced thinly
  • 1 medium apple, cored and cut into ½" chunks (I used Gala)
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice**
  • ½ cup dried cranberries
  • ⅓ cup toasted, chopped pecans***

Dressing:

  • ½ cup Greek yogurt (I used Chobani 0% plain)
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1½ tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • ½ teaspoon lemon juice
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 tablespoon freshly chopped parsley

Instructions

Prepare the salad:

  1. Place the kale, cabbage, and green onions into a large bowl. Place the apples into a small bowl and add the lemon juice. Stir to combine, then add the apples to the kale mixture with the cranberries and pecans. Toss gently, then set aside.

Prepare the dressing:

  1. Place the Greek yogurt, canola oil, vinegar, honey, lemon juice, and salt and pepper to taste in a small bowl and whisk until incorporated. Stir in the fresh parsley. Pour the dressing over the salad and toss until the salad is evenly coated with the dressing. Enjoy!

 

Falling Forward

It's another beautiful September day. We are starting to get in our fall and winter crops and we are so excited for the next 6 weeks of the share. It's hard to believe it is already mid-September and we are starting to think about winter. We've brought in an excellent winter squash harvest and our potato harvest is on-going and bountiful. The fall greens are looking great and will start appearing in the share this week. In the next few weeks - weather permitting- we will be turning our attention to cover cropping fields for the winter and bringing in our storage crops. It's the beginning of yet another season. 

Scenes from the farm: bringing in the winter squash with the Princeton University Orientation Group, the first of the potato harvest, winter squash curing (will begin to distribute in a week), harvest day scenes

The Share:

PYO Pumpkins this week! Everyone is welcome to come to the farm in Titusville this week (Thursday 3:30-7, Saturday and Sunday 10-3)* to pick a fall pumpkin!

*if you are a Buckingham member please still pick up your share on Wednesday 

salad mix

arugula

specialty greens

head lettuce

spinach

radishes

hakurei turnips

cherry tomatoes

heirloom tomatoes

eggplant

sweet peppers

hot peppers

kale 

swiss chard

potatoes

onions

carrots

dill 

parsley

celery

garlic

BURNT CARROTS WITH GOAT CHEESE, PARSLEY, ARUGULA, AND CRISPY GARLIC CHIPS

FRANCIS MALLMANN JULY 2009 SEVEN FIRES: GRILLING THE ARGENTINE WAY

INGREDIENTS

    • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
    • 1/2 cup plus 1 to 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
    • Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
    • 8 medium carrots (about 1 1/4 pounds), peeled
    • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme
    • 1 small bunch flat-leaf parsley, leaves only
    • 2 bunches arugula, trimmed, washed, and dried
    • 6 ounces Bûcheron or similar goat cheese, sliced 1/2 inch thick
    • Crispy Garlic Chips

 

PREPARATION

    1. To make the vinaigrette, pour the vinegar into a small bowl and whisk in 5 tablespoons of the extra virgin olive oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Set aside.
    2. Cut the carrots crosswise in half, then cut the halves into thick rough sticks. Toss in a bowl with 3 tablespoons of the olive oil, the thyme, and salt and pepper to taste.
    3. Heat a chapa or large cast-iron skillet over high heat. Working in batches if necessary, add the carrots in a single layer and cook, without turning, until they are charred on the bottom and almost burned, 3 to 5 minutes. Turn with a spatula and cook on the other side for 2 to 3 minutes more, adjusting the heat as necessary, until they are crunchy on the outside and tender within. Transfer to a tray. Wipe out the skillet, if using, and set aside.
    4. Combine the parsley and arugula on a large serving platter and toss lightly with half the vinaigrette. Place the carrots on top.
    5. Reheat the chapa or skillet to very high heat and coat with the remaining 1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil. Immediately add the slices of goat cheese: be careful—the oil may spatter. As soon as you see the cheese blacken on the bottom, remove the slices with a thin spatula and invert onto the carrots. Toss the garlic chips over the salad and drizzle with the remaining vinaigrette.