The Gap

Imagine all the pressures of farming - the weather, the pests, the disease, the weeds and now imagine that farmers only have one time each year to get each crop right. As an example, since I’ve been farming for 9 years, I’ve only planted potatoes 9 times, I’ve only had 9 chances in my whole life to get potatoes right. This is how the gap happens. Every late July there is a gap in the crops we plant successionally (lettuce, salad, beets and carrots) because every June, we get so busy or it rains too much and we skip a few plantings. Now because of that, every late July we have a gap in the harvest of greens. It only takes a couple weeks in June to get off course and we only have those 2 weeks to get late July and early August on track for the harvest we planned. No matter how much planning I do in the winter to prevent the gap, we let those 2 weeks in June fill with weeding or seeding or prepping fields or harvesting zucchini or any number of other things and we miss the lettuce planting. So here we are, in the gap. Lettuce and beets and carrots have been planted, but there will be gaps. We will fill them with other produce and it will be delicious. We don’t regret what we did when we weren’t planting - we were busy - but it’s tough to know we have to wait another year to try to fill the gap.

Scenes from the farm: successful zucchini and cucumber successions!, the flower pick-your-own garden looking amazing, Duma in the cucumbers, fingerling potato harvest!

The Share:

swiss chard

beets

cucumbers

summer squash

green cabbage

kohlrabi

hakurei turnips

spring onions

fennel

shishito peppers

carrots

fingerling potatoes

radishes

string beans

Summer Squash Salad with Lemon Citronette

Author: Cookie and KatePrep Time: 25 minsTotal Time: 25 minsYield: 4 1xCategory: Salad

Raw, ribboned yellow and green squash tossed with an herbed lemon vinaigrette, pine nuts and feta cheese. Buy the freshest, smallest squash you can find (local/organic will have the best flavor). Salting the squash helps draw out excess moisture, so allow 20 minutes for that step (unless you’re really pinched for time, in which case, skip it).

INGREDIENTS

Salad

¼ cup pine nuts (or slivered almonds or sunflower seeds)

2 pounds mixed baby zucchini and yellow squash

Salt

½ to 1 cup quality feta cheese, crumbled

Citronette

½ teaspoon finely grated lemon zest

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

1 large garlic clove, pressed or minced

1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme

1 teaspoon chopped fresh mint (or tarragon)

1 teaspoon chopped fresh flat-leaf (Italian) parsley

3 tablespoons olive oil

INSTRUCTIONS

Use a vegetable peeler to shave the squashes into paper-thin ribbons, starting on one side and making quarter turns until you reach the seedy core. Spread the ribbons on a cutting board, sprinkle liberally with salt, and let them sit for 20 minutes.

In a small skillet over medium-low heat, toast the nuts until they are turning golden and fragrant, stirring frequently.

Make the citronette: In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon zest and juice, garlic, thyme, mint and parsley. While whisking, drizzle in the olive oil until the dressing is well blended. Set aside until you’re ready to serve.

Rinse the squash and gently pat dry with a clean tea towel or paper towels. Place in a serving bowl (if you are not serving the salad immediately, refrigerate the squash until later).

Right before serving, whisk the citronette last time. Toss the squash with the feta, pine nuts and citronette. Serve immediately.

July

Oh July, more so than any other month (well, except for maybe August) it is a test of endurance and fortitude of our bodies and our minds. July feels like the middle of the marathon. We are in the thick of harvest season (well, luckily tomatoes are a week or two away), weed season and fall planting season. Our spring crops are fading away into the heat and the summer bonanza of peppers, eggplant and tomatoes is almost upon us. We are feeling fairly good about the harvest season so far and our crew has been amazing. We are staying hydrated and ready to face the rest of summer. It’s gonna be a hot one.

Scenes from the farm: the squash patch looking great, scallion mountain, Shay with so many cukes, Katarina on the tractor, lettuce curves looking good.

In the share:

salad mix

head lettuce

specialty greens

swiss chard

beets

cucumbers

summer squash

green cabbage

napa cabbage

kohlrabi

radishes

hakurei turnips

spring onions

kale

fennel

shishito peppers

Recipe of the week:

Grilled Spring Onions with Pistachio Butter

Ingredients

1 cup rice vinegar 1/4 cup sugar 1 bay leaf Kosher salt 1 cardamom pod 1 teaspoon black peppercorns 1 teaspoon coriander seeds 1 1/2 cups whole pitted prunes 1 1/4 cups unsalted pistachios 1 garlic clove, finely grated 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling 25 young spring onions or large scallions, trimmed 1 cup Greek yogurt 1/2 teaspoon Urfa or Aleppo pepper (see Note) Mint leaves, for garnish

How to Make It

Step 1

In a small saucepan, combine the vinegar, sugar, bay leaf, 1/2 teaspoon of salt and 3/4 cup of water. Wrap the cardamom, peppercorns and coriander seeds in a cheesecloth bundle and add to the saucepan. Simmer the brine over moderate heat for 10 minutes. Put the prunes in a heatproof bowl, pour the brine over them and let stand for 2 hours.

Step 2

Drain the prunes, reserving the brine. Discard the spice bundle and bay leaf. Simmer the brine until it coats the back of a spoon, 10 minutes, then pour over the prunes in the bowl.

Step 3

Preheat the oven to 300°. Spread the pistachios on a baking sheet and bake until lightly browned, 12 to 15 minutes. Transfer to a food processor and let cool. Add the garlic and lemon zest and process until finely chopped, 1 minute. 
Add 2 tablespoons of the olive oil and 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons of water and process until a smooth paste forms; season with salt.

Step 4

Light a grill. In a large bowl, toss the spring onions with the remaining 1/4 cup of olive oil and season with salt. Grill the onions over moderately high heat until tender and lightly charred, 6 to 8 minutes.

Step

Step 5

Quarter 8 of the prunes. (Save the rest for another use.) Spread the yogurt and pistachio butter on a platter. Top with the grilled onions and season with the Urfa pepper. Garnish with the prunes, mint leaves and a drizzle of olive 
oil; serve immediately.

Notes

An Aleppo pepper (pronounced Uh-LEPPO) is a dried ground pepper from Syria and Turkey. It's mildly spicy, tart and fruity. An Urfa pepper (pronounced ER-fah) is a smoky, coarsely ground Turkish chile.

Garlic

We harvested our garlic this past week. Garlic is planted in the fall usually around the end of October, over wintered under mulch, weeded in the spring and harvested around the 1st of July. Garlic planting is the last planting of the season and garlic harvest is the first big harvest of the next season. It always falls right in the time when we are transitioning from spring planting to summer harvest and the to-do list is extra long. But if the garlic stays in the ground too long it will begin to separate and rot. It needs a dry few days before harvest and full day of sun to get it out of the ground and into the barn to cure. I love the connection garlic gives us to the previous season, thinking of the planting in the cold with last year’s crew, connecting to the hot and humid day of harvest just after solstice. It is a cycle that keeps us grounded to season’s and it’s a day I am overwhelmed by and look forward to every year (provided the crop is good, of course).

Scenes: when the Cooking School intern, Karl brought us coffee on garlic planting day, harvest with the 2019 crew, the truck full of garlic.


The Share:

salad mix

head lettuce

beets

cabbage

napa cabbage

kale

kohlrabi

summer squash

cucumber

hakurei turnips

radishes

spring onions

fennel

radicchio

escarole

Recipe of the week:

Kohlrabi, Fennel and Blueberry Salad

Ingredients

1/2 cup sliced almonds 2 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger 2 tablespoons minced shallot 1 tablespoon white balsamic vinegar 1 tablespoon mayonnaise 1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon soy sauce 1 teaspoon pure maple syrup 1/4 cup grapeseed oil Salt and freshly ground pepper 1 1/4 pounds kohlrabi, peeled and very thinly sliced on a mandoline 1 fennel bulb, trimmed and thinly sliced on a mandoline 2 ounces semifirm goat cheese, such as Evalon, Garrotxa or Manchester, shaved (1/2 cup) 1 cup blueberries or pitted, halved sweet cherries 2 tablespoons torn mint leaves

How to Make It

Step 1

Preheat the oven to 350°. Spread the almonds on a pie plate and toast for about 7 minutes, until golden. Let cool.

Step 2

In a mini food processor or blender, combine the ginger, shallot, vinegar, mayonnaise, mustard, soy sauce and maple syrup and puree. With the blender on, add the grapeseed oil in a thin stream and blend until creamy. Season the dressing with salt and pepper.

Step 3

In a large bowl, toss the kohlrabi with the fennel, cheese, toasted almonds and dressing. Season with salt and pepper and toss to coat. Add the blueberries and mint and toss gently. Serve right away.

And summer begins...

Here’s hoping this sunny weather sticks around. It is so much easier to farm when the fields are dry enough to walk and drive on. Our crops are looking great but losing a week of weeding and planting can really set us back. We will try to catch up as much as possible this week as long as the thunderstorms stay at bay. We hope that you’ve been enjoying your share and we can’t wait to continue harvesting the bounty that our hard working crew has to offer you. Don’t forget that the PYO garden is now open for sugar snap peas, flowers and herbs!

Scenes from the farm: the PYO garden, harvest day exhaustion (photo cred, Zainab), cultivating pathways before it rained for a week, Duma and the cabbage, staking the high tunnel tomatoes, Duma and the scallions.

The Share:

Salad mix

head lettuce

kohlrabi

napa cabbage

green cabbage

scallions

summer squash

kale

sugar snap peas

escarole

radicchio

fennel

beets

radishes

hakurei turnip

specialty greens

bok choy

SPRING PASTA SALAD WITH ESCAROLE, RADISHES AND PEAS

https://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipe/spring-pasta-salad-escarole-radishes-and-peas

Ingredients:

3/4 cup vegan sour cream (or regular sour cream)

1/2 lemon, Juice of

2 lemons, Zest of

2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives

2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill

1 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley, chopped

1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt

1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

1 pound whole wheat penne pasta

3 cups spring pea pods or sugar snap peas, cut in half crosswise

1 head escarole, torn into bite-size pieces

1 bunch radishes (about 8 radishes), trimmed and thinly sliced

4 green onions, diced

Method:

Put sour cream, lemon juice, lemon zest, chives, dill and parsley into a small bowl and whisk together to make a dressing. Season with salt and pepper and set aside.

Cook pasta according to directions on package. When pasta is almost ready to be drained, quickly drop the pea pods into the water with the pasta, stir once and then drain everything together into a colander. Once drained, transfer the hot pasta and peas to a large bowl. Add escarole, radishes, green onions and reserved dressing and toss well. Serve immediately.

Solstice Feels

The week of the solstice always feels like a heavy one. The long days are both a gift and a burden. Feeling happy for the plants to be getting the long hours of sunlight that they need but also feeling tired by the longer days of working. It seems as though rain is bringing us through this transition and we hope that with the change into real summer we might get some drier weather. It’s true though that have had some incredibly beautiful days this spring that we are truly grateful for. It’s that windy, crisp and sunny weather that make us so happy to be working outside. Happy solstice to everyone, make sure to take a moment to appreciate the light as we now slowly make our way back to winter.

Scenes from the farm: potatoes looking good, lettuces in the sunlight, peas and kale in layers, staking tomatoes, zoomed in Duma in the row cover.

The Share:

salad mix

head lettuce

radishes

hakurei turnips

kohlrabi

power greens mix

sugar snap peas (open for Pick Your Own!)

beets!

radicchio

escarole

swiss chard

baby fennel

kale

napa cabbage

green cabbage

scallions

summer squash!

Recipe of the week:

Grilled Radicchio Salad

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/grilled-radicchio-salad-with-sherry-mustard-dressing

INGREDIENTS

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil plus additional for drizzling

1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill

1 tablespoon Sherry wine vinegar

2 teaspoons Dijon mustard

1 teaspoon honey

1

6 green onions, trimmed

1 head of romaine lettuce, quartered lengthwise with some core still attached to each piece

1 large head of red leaf lettuce, quartered lengthwise with some core still attached to each piece

1 medium head of radicchio, quartered through core, with some core still attached to each piece

RECIPE PREPARATION

Whisk 3 tablespoons olive oil and next 4 ingredients. Season with salt and pepper.

Arrange green onions, lettuces, and radicchio on baking sheets. Drizzle lightly with oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Prepare barbecue (medium-high heat). Grill vegetables until beginning to wilt, 1 minute per side for red leaf lettuce, 1 1/2 minutes per side for romaine, 2 minutes per side for green onions, and 3 minutes per side for radicchio. Transfer vegetables to baking sheets.

Cut cores from all grilled greens. Cut grilled radicchio crosswise into 1-inch-wide strips. Cut grilled lettuces crosswise into 2-inch-wide strips; chop green onions. Place vegetables in large bowl. Drizzle with dressing; toss to coat.

A tale of cover crops

Cover crops are crops that farmers plant that will never be harvested to sell. They are crops that are seeded in between “cash crop” plantings to help build soil, add nutrients, prevent erosion and create pollinator habitat. Generally, cover crops are made of grains or grasses such rye, buckwheat, or millet and legumes such as vetch, peas or clover. They are a wonderful tool, touted by all in the organic industry as a perfect way to increase soil fertility and the health of your farm. I love cover crops, I love planting them and watching a good stand develop, I love seeing plants growing that will feed the soil and I love that they feed the bees. Here’s the problem: cover cropping is hard. It’s hard to find the time in between caring for vegetables to seed them, it’s hard to get the seeds, its hard to establish them before weeds take over, and it’s really really hard to kill them. Getting cover crops incorporated back into the soil to give them plenty of time to break down before planting vegetables is a real challenge. We do not have heavy equipment to help us with this problem and I watch my conventional farmer neighbors spray glyphosate to kill the crops in their fields while I wrestle with a plow for hours and hours trying to get cover crops tilled in and then have to wait weeks before planting. It’s a pain. It is one huge way I can truly tell you why organic agriculture is a very different beast then the conventional system of using chemical herbicides. It is a constant struggle between the need to care for crops to be harvested and those that will feed the crops in the future. Organic/sustainable farmers are working for the future even as our “cash crops” in most cases are barely supporting the present. Long story short: thank an organic farmer the next time you see them.

Cover crop scenes: a beautiful stand of field pea cover crops that need to be tilled in for fall vegetables plantings, those peas getting stuck in the plow over and over again, the amazing root nodules on the peas that are fixing nitrogen into the soil, and finally a selfie with the biggest head of lettuce ever (who says organic farming can’t feed the world?!)

The share:

radishes

hakurei turnips

specialty greens

escarole

scallions

head lettuce

salad mix

baby bok choy

curly kale

toscano kale

napa cabbage

green cabbage

baby fennel

beets!

kohlrabi

swiss chard

radicchio

sugar snap peas

Recipe of the week:

Sautéed Baby Bok Choy

SAM SIFTON

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1013418-sauteed-baby-bok-choy

INGREDIENTS

2 tablespoons neutral cooking oil, like canola

2 garlic cloves, peeled and minced

1 ½-inch piece ginger root, peeled and minced

¼ teaspoon red-pepper flakes, or to taste

4 bunches of baby bok choy, approximately 1½ pounds, cleaned, with the ends trimmed

1 tablespoon soy sauce

1 tablespoon chicken stock or water

Toasted sesame oil for drizzling

PREPARATION

In a large sauté pan with a lid, heat oil over medium-high heat until it starts to shimmer. Add garlic, ginger and red-pepper flakes and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 45 seconds.

Add bok choy and stir carefully to cover with oil, then cook for approximately 2 minutes. Add soy sauce, stock or water, then cover pan and cook for approximately 2 minutes more, until steam begins to escape from beneath the lid of the pan.

Uncover and continue to cook until liquid is close to evaporated and stalks are soft to the touch, approximately 3 minutes more.

Remove to a warmed platter and drizzle with sesame oil.

All Hail the Weather Gods and Goddesses

Well, last week was a bit of a bruiser. A farm can live and die at the mercy of a hail storm. We were out in the fields trying to seed the parsnips until the very loudest crack of thunder and stroke of lightening made us run for cover in the barn. As we watched the hail come with the storm, this farmer sat quietly in the corner breathing hard, trying not to think of the whole season’s work bring destroyed in one instant. Luckily, as the storm passed by we went to inspect our crops and found a few holes and a few bruises but nothing to call a disaster. Our neighbors down the road were not so lucky and we hold them in our hearts as they try to figure out their next move with tomato plants stripped of their leaves and orchard trees destroyed. What a thing weather can be. We are so utterly powerless to its whims and the dangers are only getting greater with the affects of climate change. We thank you so much for supporting local farms and as the weather patterns become more uncertain, your support will be ever more so necessary. Let’s hope that’s the last of the hail for the season.

Scenes: hail damage at my house (thank goodness not at the farm), new bed for the new pick up truck (rainy day projects), Duma staying in the pathway of the growing zucchini.

The Share:

radishes

sugar snap peas

hakurei turnips

specialty greens

escarole

scallions

head lettuce

salad mix

garlic scapes

baby bok choy

pea shoots

curly kale

toscano kale

napa cabbage

kohlrabi

Recipe of the week:

kohlrabi slaw with cilantro, jalapeño and lime

Delicious and refreshing Kohlrabi Slaw with cilantro, jalapeño and lime! Vegan, GF | www.feastingathome.com

Refreshing and healthy Kohlrabi Slaw made with kohlrabi, cilantro, lime, jalapeño and a simple citrus vinaigrette.

Author: Sylvia Fountaine | Feasting at Home BlogPrep Time: 25 minsTotal Time: 20 minsYield: 4-6 1xCategory:

ingredients

6 cups kohlrabi -cut into matchsticks or grated in a food processor -about three x 4 inch bulbs (or you could substitute sliced fennel, apple, jicama, cucumber, or cabbage for part of the kohlrabi for more diversity)

½ cup chopped cilantro ( one small bunch)

half of a jalapeno -minced

1/4 cup chopped scallion

orange zest from one orange, and juice

lime zest from one lime, and juice

Citrus Dressing :

1/4 Cup olive oil

¼ Cup fresh orange juice ( juice form one orange)

1/8 Cup lime juice plus 1 T ( juice from one large lime), more to taste

1/4 Cup honey ( or agave syrup)

1/2 tsp kosher salt

1 Tablespoon rice wine vinegar

instructions

Trim and peel kohlrabi. ( I normally have to peel twice to get thru the thick skin). Cut off two ends. Cut in half from top to bottom. Thinly slice, rotate and slice again, making 1/4 inch matchsticks.

Place in large bowl with chopped cilantro, scallions, finly chopped jalapeño ( 1/2), lime zest and orange zest.

Whisk dressing together in a small bowl. Toss with salad. Refrigerate until serving. Garnish with zest and cilantro. This tastes goo the next day too.

CSA Season is here!

If you are new to the CSA, this newsletter is where you will find weekly musings on farm life, a few pictures from the week, the list of what will be available in the share and a recipe using one or more of the ingredients from the share. Please check weekly!

We’ve been preparing fields, seeding transplants, planting and weeding since March in preparation for this very week! We are so happy to report that this spring has been kind to us, weather wise. Although it’s been a bit rainy, we’ve been able to get into the fields, plant on schedule and even keep up with the weeds! (so far…)

We believe that last year’s season of monsoon rains made us smarter farmers. We have employed techniques to help us get through wetter times on the farm while also continuing to build soil, and we hope that this season will be the best one yet!

We have an amazing crew of energetic young folks excited to grow food for you this season. They are learning the ropes and doing great. Please check out the team here on our website: http://rootstoriverfarm.com/people

Scenes from the farm this spring:

What will be available in the share:

salad mix

head lettuce

pea shoots

radishes

hakurei turnips

young napa cabbage

specialty greens mix (baby mustard and baby kale)

curly kale

toscano/lacinato kale

kohlrabi

scallions

escarole

garlic scapes (use just like garlic!)

Recipe of the week

(courtesy of my mother-in-law, Cindy Knauer)

Coconut Creamed Turnip Greens (use with the hakurei turnip and radish greens!)

1 bunch turnip greens (from about 1 lb worth of fresh turnips) chopped or torn into large pieces

1/2 can coconut milk (not light)

6 tablespoons apple cider vinegar, or to taste (I start with 2 and add more according to how many greens I have)

1 1/2 tsp Frank's Red Hot, or to taste (use any cayenne pepper sauce)

1 Tablespoon coconut oil

Instructions:

1. Start with a deep sided frying pan on low heat.

2. Melt the coconut oil, then toss in the turnip greens. Cook, stirring occasionally, for just a minute until the greens start to wilt just slightly. Pour in the coconut milk and mix everything well.

3. Add in half the vinegar and half the pepper sauce. Stir everything up and let cook for another minute or so.

4. Check the taste, and add more vinegar and pepper sauce, mixing well after each addition, until you are happy with the "zing." Don't overcook!

this recipe came from "Purely Primal" at http://purelyprimal.com/2011/06/10/coconut-creamed-turnip-greens/

The Last Share (for now)

Well, it seems as if we planned this almost perfectly. While we are sad that the Winter Share could not go longer this winter, we are actually almost out of our stores of root vegetables. We are usually half way through our root cellar, but 2018 offered such paltry growing conditions it’s effect has rippled through our winter season to now. Farming is always a game played far into the future. We have loved the opportunity to grow for you this winter, it gets us out of the house and into our overalls to tend to greens and check on storage temps. It let’s us keep a few people employed in the slow months and has us surrounded by green long after the world outside has turned gray. Your support of our Winter CSA means so much and we hope you’ve enjoyed it. We are only sorry it couldn’t go on longer. But please sign up for a Summer Share so you have something incredible to look forward to as we journey on to the end of February and beyond! The seeds are ordered and the fields are mapped and we are excited and hopeful for a wonderful season! Please join us.

http://rootstoriverfarm.com/sign-up



The Share:

1 big bag salad

1 head lettuce

1 bunch kale

6 pounds roots: carrots (limit 1 pound), potatoes, beets, daikon, rutabaga, purple top turnips, kohlrabi, watermelon radish

1 quart kimchi or sauerkraut

1 jar tomato: sauce, puree, butter or ketchup

1 head garlic

Kohlrabi Carrot Fritters with Avocado Cream Sauce

INGREDIENTS

2 kohlrabi

1 carrot

1 egg

¼ teaspoon kosher salt

¼ teaspoon cayenne

½ cup grapeseed or vegetable oil (enough for ¼-inch depth in a large skillet)

½ avocado

¼ cup plain yogurt

½ lemon

¼ teaspoon kosher salt

Green onions (for garnish)

INSTRUCTIONS

Cut the leaves off the kohlrabi and peel the bulb. Peel 1 carrot. Shred the vegetables in a food processor, or by hand using a grater. Squeeze the shredded vegetables in a tea cloth (or with your hands) to remove moisture, then add to a medium bowl with 1 egg, 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt, and 1/4 teaspoon cayenne. Mix to combine.

Place 1/2 cup oil in a large skillet (enough for 1/4-inch depth). Heat the oil over medium high heat, then place small patties of the fritter mixture into the oil. Fry on one side until browned, then fry on the other side. Remove and place on a plate lined with a paper towel to drain excess oil.

In a small bowl, mix 1/2 avocado, 1/4 cup plain yogurt, juice from 1/2 lemon, and 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt to make the avocado cream (or blend the ingredients together in a food processor).

Serve fritters with avocado cream and sliced green onions. Note: These fritters are best eaten warm the day of making; they don’t save well. Like anything made with avocado, the avocado cream sauce will become brown after exposure to air. Make sure to cover the surface with plastic wrap when storing.

Starling in Winter

In honor of the passing of Mary Oliver, I must post a poem here. This poem called to me during this time of self reflection, winter transitions and recovery from the challenging season of 2018. I hope you enjoy it.

“Starlings in Winter” by Mary Oliver

Chunky and noisy,

but with stars in their black feathers,

they spring from the telephone wire

and instantly

they are acrobats

in the freezing wind.

And now, in the theater of air,

they swing over buildings,

dipping and rising;

they float like one stippled star

that opens,

becomes for a moment fragmented,

then closes again;

and you watch

and you try

but you simply can’t imagine

how they do it

with no articulated instruction, no pause,

only the silent confirmation

that they are this notable thing,

this wheel of many parts, that can rise and spin

over and over again,

full of gorgeous life.

Ah, world, what lessons you prepare for us,

even in the leafless winter,

even in the ashy city.

I am thinking now

of grief, and of getting past it;

I feel my boots

trying to leave the ground,

I feel my heart

pumping hard. I want

to think again of dangerous and noble things.

I want to be light and frolicsome.

I want to be improbable beautiful and afraid of nothing,

as though I had wings.

Scenes from the farm: securing the high tunnels before the deep freeze, icy walks in the woods with Duma, and harvesting salad greens in the high tunnel

January

Understory

By Mark Nepo

I’ve been watching stars

rely on the darkness they

resist. And fish struggle with

and against the current. And

hawks glide faster when their

wings don’t move.

Still I keep retelling what

happens till it comes out

the way I want.

We try so hard to be the

main character when it is

our point of view that

keeps us from the truth.

The sun has its story

that no curtain can stop.

It’s true. The only way beyond

the self is through it. The only

way to listen to what can never

be said is to quiet our need

to steer the plot.

When jarred by life, we might

unravel the story we tell ourselves

and discover the story we are in,

the one that keeps telling us.

Scenes from the farm: walks in the woods, the sky over fields, and cleaning up the compost

The Share:

1 bunch kale

1 bag salad mix

1 head lettuce

1 cabbage

1 jar kimchi

1 garlic

5 pounds roots: beets, potatoes, celery root, watermelon radish, daikon, purple top turnip

Quick Pickled Daikon

Ingredients

1 cup rice vinegar

1 cup water

1 cup sugar

1/4 teaspoon turmeric

1 pound daikon radish

1/4 cup kosher salt

Directions

In a small saucepan over medium heat add the vinegar, water, sugar, and turmeric. Bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Remove from heat and allow it to cool.

Meanwhile, peel the daikon radish and slice into 1/4-inch thick rounds. (If your daikon is very large, slice the rounds into semicircles.) Place in a colander with salt and mix well. Place the colander over a bowl and let drain for 1 hour. Rinse the salt off with a couple of changes of water and dry the daikon well. Put into a sterilized glass jar. Pour the cooled brine through a coffee filter (or a cheesecloth lined strainer) into the jar to cover the radish slices. Refrigerate at least 4 hours, preferably overnight. Will keep for about 2 weeks.

Happy New Year!

Oh 2018! As farmers we are not sad to see it go. Although the year held incredible happiness (including getting married! and an amazing honeymoon!) it was one of epic agricultural challenges. As the new year is upon us we are in deep reflection and intense planning for the new season. How can we learn from last years challenges to become more resilient, use our resources more efficiently and create a farm that can withstand the extremes of climate change? Of course, we’re not sure but we’re working on it. Our New Year’s Resolution is to be flexible in the face of challenge, to work to find new a better ways to be stewards of our lands and community. We are so thankful to have you all as part of our farm family and we hope you will join us in the journey through 2019 and beyond. Wishing everyone a beautiful and bountiful 2019!

Scenes from the farm: lettuce in the greenhouses, cozy dogs in front of the fire, and evening walks on the canal (life is pretty good!)

The Share:

1 bag salad

1 head lettuce

1 kale

1 radicchio

1 cabbage

1 bunch carrots

5 pounds roots: daikon, purple top turnips, beets, celery root, potato, watermelon radish, kohlrabi

1 jar tomato preserves

Farro Salad With Beets, Greens and Feta

MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1016092-farro-salad-with-beets-greens-and-feta?login=email

INGREDIENTS

2 medium or 3 small beets (any color) with greens, the beets roasted, the greens stemmed and washed in two changes of water

1 cup farro, soaked for one hour in water to cover and drained

Salt, preferably kosher salt, to taste

2 tablespoons sherry vinegar

1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar

1 small garlic clove, minced or pureed

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

½ cup extra virgin olive oil (may substitute 1 to 2 tablespoons walnut oil for 1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil)

½ cup broken walnut pieces

2 ounces feta or goat cheese, crumbled (more if desired for garnish)

¼ cup chopped fresh herbs, such as parsley, tarragon, marjoram, chives, mint

Nutritional Information

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PREPARATION

Bring 2 quarts water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Fill a bowl with ice water. When the water comes to a boil, add salt to taste and the greens. Blanch for two minutes, and transfer to the ice water. Allow to cool for a few minutes, then drain and squeeze out excess water. Chop coarsely and set aside.

Bring the water back to a boil, and add the farro. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer 45 minutes, stirring from time to time, or until the farro is tender. Remove from the heat and allow the grains to swell in the cooking water for 10 minutes, then drain.

While the farro is cooking, make the vinaigrette. Whisk together the vinegars, salt, garlic and mustard. Whisk in the oil(s). Add to the farro. Peel and dice the beets and add, along with the beet greens, feta or goat cheese, herbs and walnuts. Toss together, and serve warm or room temperature with a little more cheese sprinkled over the top if you wish.

solstice

The solstice is a time for us to slow down. To embrace the season for its cold, its darkness, for its stillness. In these days where we are always racing to get things done, it is good to take a step back to live in the moment, to feel everything around us, and be grateful.


Scenes from the farm:

The Share:

4 pounds root veggies: beets, celery root, potatoes, kohlrabi, daikon, purple top turnips

1 head garlic

1 bunch kale

1 head radicchio

1 head escarole

1 bunch parsley

1 bag greens

1 cabbage

1/2 organically grown butternut squash from Genesis Farm in Blairstown NJ

braised escarole with garlic and lemon juice

  • 1 head escarole, about 1 pound

  •  1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

  •  1 tablespoon unsalted butter

  •  4 garlic cloves, sliced

  •  1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

  •  2 bay leaves

  •  1/2 lemon, cut in thin slices

  •  2 cups water or chicken broth

  •  Pinch sugar

  •  Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

  1. Break off the leaves of the escarole and wash them individually, taking care to remove any soil at the base of the stems. Shake the leaves dry, stack them up, and slice the escarole crosswise into ribbons about 1 1/2-inches wide.

  2. Place a large deep skillet over medium heat and add the olive oil and butter. Toss in the garlic, red pepper flakes, bay leaves, and lemon slices; cook and stir for a couple of minutes, tossing to combine. Nestle the escarole into the pan and saute until it begins to wilt and shrink down, about 2 minutes. Sprinkle the escarole with a pinch of sugar and season with salt and pepper. Pour in the water and cover the pan. Simmer for 20 minutes until the escarole is tender.

The first Winter Share!

The winter share begins this week! As the farm transitions to winter routines it’s nice to keep our hands busy with prepping veggies, making kimchi and sauerkraut, and watching over our winter greens houses. Some of the crew have switched to winter jobs - pruning blueberries and cutting christmas trees, some of us are still busy finishing up the last of the clean-up projects and getting everything stored away for winter. We are looking forward to a time of rest and reflection. It never comes soon enough after the intensity of a farming season and more time by the wood stove with friends and family is exactly what is in order in the coming weeks. We thank you so much for joining us this winter and we hope you enjoy your share!

Scenes from the last few weeks on the farm:

The Share:

3 pounds root veggies: beets, celery root, potatoes, kohlrabi, daikon, purple top turnips

1 head garlic

2 bunches kale

1 head radicchio

1 head escarole

1 head lettuce

1 bunch parsley

1 head napa cabbage

1 bag greens

1 gunma cabbage

1 organically grown butternut squash from Genesis Farm in Blairstown NJ

Recipe of the week:

Warm Triple Greens Salad

by Ian Knauer

1 head escarole

1 head radicchio

1 bunch kale

Dressing:

3 tablespoons mayonnaise

1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

1 clove garlic

Cut the kale, radicchio and escarole into bite sized pieces, kale stems included

Blanch the greens into boiling salted water until just tender, about 2 minutes, drain

In a bowl whisk together mayonnaise, vinegar and black pepper to taste

Mince and mash the garlic clove with a pinch of salt to a paste using the side of chefs knife on the cutting board

Whisk the garlic into the mayonnaise mixture

Season to salt and pepper to taste

Toss the greens with the dressing to serve


The Last Pickup

All we have to say is thank you thank you thank you for your support this season. We have learned a lot from this challenging year and we are so looking forward to a winter of planning, re-organizing, simplifying and strategizing. Our crew this year has been incredible beyond expectations. Through the rain, the constant changing of plans, and the frustration of crop failures they have been upbeat, good humored, flexible and incredibly strong. Our customers have kept us going and we can’t say how much we appreciate your support. Here’s to hoping for a mild winter and drier 2019!

We still have a few spaces left for the Winter Share! Don’t forget to sign up!

And email us at malaika@rootstotriverfarm.com to renew for 2019 and get your 5% discount!

Scenes from the farm: Winter greens planting in our driest houses, Breezy and her giant brassica plant, Duma’s eyes matching the fall foliage, fall foliage at the New Hope farm, Karl (the farm cooking school intern) delivering coffee to the garlic planting crew, and daikon purple brilliance.

The Share:

head lettuce

tatsoi

spicy bunches

cabbage

curly kale

lacinato kale

parsley

rutabaga

celery root

purple top turnips

fennel

radicchio

escarole

onions

garlic

potatoes

daikon

celery root

Daikon Fritters

http://www.foodwise.com.au/recipes/daikon-fritters/

Ingredients

1 medium-large daikon radish, peeled and grated

1/2 cup besan (chickpea) flour

1 tsp crushed ginger

1/2 cup spring onion or leek

Small handful fresh coriander, chopped

Dash of tamari or soy sauce

Water to bind

Oil for frying

Lemon slices to serve

Method

Peel and grate the daikon, chop up the leek or spring onion and coriander, and pop them into a mixing bowl. Add the ginger and dash of soy sauce or tamari and mix. Then add the besan (chickpea) flour and add water to measure to create a sticky batter by giving the ingredients a good mix, removing all lumps.

Cover the base of a frying pan or skillet with a good high smoking point oil such as light olive oil or peanut oil, and turn it on to high-medium heat.

Once the oil is hot, drop spoonfuls of the fritter batter into the hot pan, and flatten with a spatula. Fry until golden brown, flip and repeat. It should only take about 3-4 minutes per side. If your fritters are browning too fast, turn the heat down a little to avoid burning the sides and leaving the centre gooey.

When cooked through, remove from heat and place your fritter on some paper towel to drain.

Serve with a soy and rice vinegar dipping sauce, or just some freshly cut lemon wedges.

The End Weeks

It seems unbelievable to think the end of the official season is only weeks away since we are still in the midst of a crazy to-do list. The last of the winter plantings are going in the ground. The garlic will be planted this week for next year’s harvest. We still have crops to harvest for winter storage and tons of cleanup to do. It takes all season to build the farm and then we only have a few weeks to dismantle all our work and put it all to bed for the winter. It truly is a crazy 9 month ride.

This week we will be sending out our end of season member survey. Please let us know what you think of your experience!

Sign up for a winter share! It helps the farm stay in business all year and you get lots of yummy things to make soup with!

ALSO, 2019 renewals are available! Returning members who sign up before December get a 5% discount on their share for next year. (Share prices are the same as last year).

Thank you again for you support and please enjoy the last 2 pickups of the season!

Best,

You Farmers

head lettuce

special mix bunches

kale

tatsoi

parsley

fennel

daikon

sweet peppers

watermelon radish

escarole

kohlrabi

rutabaga

celery root

radicchio

onions

garlic

Celery Root Bisque with Walnut-Parsley Gremolata

45 MIN

Total Time

1 HR 30 MIN

Yield

Serves : 8

Ingredients

1 tablespoon unsalted butter 1 large leek, white and light green parts only, thinly sliced 5 garlic cloves, crushed 2 1/2 pounds celery root, peeled and cut into 1-inch dice (8 cups) One 2-inch chunk of Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese (1 ounce), plus 1/4 cup freshly grated cheese 2 cups chicken stock or low-sodium broth 1/2 cup walnuts 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 cup coarsely chopped parsley 1/2 cup heavy cream Kosher salt Pepper

GET INGREDIENTS

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How to Make It

Step 1

In a large saucepan, melt the butter. Add the leek and garlic and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until softened, 5 minutes. Add the celery root, Parmesan chunk, stock and 5 cups of water and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook over moderately low heat, stirring occasionally, until the celery root is tender, 40 minutes.

Step 2

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 375°. Spread the walnuts in a pie plate and toast for 5 to 7 minutes, until golden. Let cool, then finely chop and transfer to a bowl. Add the oil, parsley and grated cheese and mix well.

Step 3

In a blender, puree the soup in 2 batches until very smooth. Pour into a clean saucepan and stir in the heavy cream; season with salt and pepper and reheat if necessary. Serve topped with the walnut gremolata.

Make Ahead

The soup can be refrigerated for 2 days.

First Frost!

We had our first frost this week. We’ve been busy cleaning up the fields, protecting crops again the frost, and harvesting away! Fall’s bounty is really starting to roll in.

scenes from the farm: Phoenix picking hot peppers, happy radishes, Natalie’s gorgeous flowers.

the share:

Salad mix

special mix bunches

kale

tatsoi

parsley

fennel

daikon

sweet peppers

eggplant

shishito

watermelon radish

escarole

kohlrabi

dandelion

broccoli raab

cabbage

onions

garlic

s

recipe of the week:

fennel, orange, and cabbage slaw

ingredients

  • 6 cups shredded cabbage

  • 2 medium oranges, peeled and segmented

  • 1 large fennel bulb, thinly sliced

  • 1/4 cup chopped Italian parsley

  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise

  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

  • 1 teaspoon spicy brown mustard

  • 2 teaspoons brown sugar

  • Fresh cracked black pepper, to taste

  • 1/2 cup sliced almonds

how to make it

Step 1    

In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, oranges, fennel, and parsley.

Step 2    

In another bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, apple cider vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, mustard, brown sugar, and pepper.

Step 3    

Pour the dressing over the cabbage mixture and toss to coat. Chill and garnish with the almonds just before serving.

fall’s bounty

All this rain has made for some gloomy days, you know the ones that make you want to curl up with a cup of tea under a blanket. But there is so much beauty in the fall as well, the changing leaves, the moments when the sun peaks through the clouds, and of course fall’s produce bounty!

Scenes from the farm: beautiful harvest days, a perfect turnip among the asters, chaos with duma

the share

Fennel

Daikon radish

Purple top turnip

Tatsoi

Kale

Broccoli

Green cabbage

Napa cabbage

Parsley

Dandelion

Shishitos

Sweet peppers

Eggplant

Onions

Garlic

Buttered Turnip Puree

Ingredients
3 large turnips, peeled and cut into uniform chunks
1 quart milk
3 fresh thyme sprigs
1 clove garlic, peeled and gently smashed with the side of a knife
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, cut into small cubes
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions
Combine the turnips, milk, thyme and garlic in a medium saucepan. Set over medium heat and partially cover the pan. Bring to a gentle simmer and cook for 20 to 30 minutes, until the turnips are tender-the tip of a paring knife should go through without resistance.
Drain the turnips, reserving the cooking liquid, and transfer to a food processor (discard the thyme sprigs). Add about 1 cup of the reserved cooking liquid and the butter, season with plenty of salt and pepper and puree until smooth. Add more of the liquid, if necessary. Serve hot.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/tyler-florence/buttered-turnip-puree-recipe2.print.html?oc=linkback

cool mornings

It’s actually starting to feel like autumn on the farm. From cool foggy mornings to windy afternoons, fall is here. And that means seeding cover crop, planting for winter, cleaning up fields and harvesting fall’s bounty!

Please join us for the Winter Share and receive farm produce through the whole year! We have big plans for lots of greens and delicious roots. We'd love to have you. 

http://rootstoriverfarm.com/winter-share/

scenes from the farm: a glorious morning, garlic, perfect fennel, the purple top turnip

the share:

fennel

daikon radish

watermelon radish

purple top turnip

tatsoi

specialty greens

kale

kohlrabi

parsley

eggplant

sweet peppers

potatoes

garlic onions

cinnamon apple turnip soup

ingredients:

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus more for serving

1 medium onion, peeled and chopped

2 cloves garlic, smashed

1 1/2 pounds turnips, peeled and diced

1/2 pound Granny Smith apples (2 or 3) peeled and diced, plus more for serving

2 tablespoons packed dark brown sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt

3/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

3/4 teaspoon cinnamon, plus more for serving

1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional)

4 cups low-sodium chicken or vegetable stock

2-4 tablespoons heavy cream, plus more for serving

instructions:

Heat the oil in a large pot over medium-high heat. Add the onion and garlic and saute until the onion is translucent, 4 to 5 minutes. Add the turnips, apples, sugar, salt, pepper, cinnamon, and cayenne and saute until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add the stock and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, partially cover the pot, and simmer until the turnips and apples are fork-tender, about 20 minutes. Remove from the heat and puree the soup with an immersion blender (or in batches in a regular blender). Stir in the cream. Top with a drizzle of olive oil and cream, some chopped apples, and a sprinkle of cinnamon before serving.

October

We can’t believe it’s already October! We are starting to switch to clean-up mode but are still working hard to get ready for winter and stock the root cellar with what has survived this challenging season. So far the beets, potatoes, watermelon radishes, daikon, celery root, broccoli, , cabbages, cauliflower, fennel, radicchio, kohlrabi, napa cabbage, rutabaga, turnips and kale look great for the rest of the season and beyond. We had a total crop failure on our winter squash due to early disease, rot in the field and deer damage and a minor crop failure on our carrots where most of the sprouts rotted away after germinating in the field. Our greens and spinach have not fared well with all of the water - they suffer when their roots are constantly wet but we will continue to harvest what we can. For a farmer, a couple crop losses can overshadow and whole list of successes, but we also continue going with an eternal optimism that most of the time could be called stubbornness. It’s a good thing we love what we do.

I have said this before and I will say it many more times— we can’t thank you enough for your support this season. We hope that you’ve been enjoying the harvest this year - we have been doing the best we can and we couldn’t be doing it all without your membership. So thank you.

Scenes from the farm: fennel after weeding, radicchio weeding, zinnia patch still going strong, Breezy and Duma having deep talks, an afternoon field walk in the brassica patch.

The Share:

specialty greens

broccoli raab

tatsoi

kale

watermelon radish

sweet peppers

plum tomatoes

eggplant

fairytale eggplant

shishito peppers

fingerling potatoes

parsley

kohlrabi

onions

garlic

Roasted Kohlrabi with Parmesan

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchen/roasted-kohlrabi-with-parmesan-3561919

Directions

Peel 6 kohlrabi and cut into 1-inch wedges; toss with 2 tablespoons olive oil, 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt and a pinch of cayenne on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast at 450 degrees F, stirring every 10 minutes, until tender and golden, about 30 minutes. Toss with 3 tablespoons parmesan and 1 tablespoon chopped parsley.